Diving patterns and performance in the Antarctic blue-eyed shag Phalacrocorax atriceps

first_imgThe pattern and characteristics of diving of two male blue‐eyed shags Phalacrocorax atriceps were studied, using continuous‐recording time‐depth recorders, for a total of 15 consecutive days during which the depth, duration, bottom time, ascent and descent rates and surface intervals of 674 dives were recorded. Deep dives (> 35 m, averages80–90 m, max. 116 m) were twice as common (64% versus 34%) as shallow dives (< 21 m and 90% < 10 m). Deep dives were long (averages 2.7‐4.1 min, max. 5.2 min) with half the time spent near maximum depth and fast travel speeds (averages 1.0‐2.4 m s−1). Shallow dives were short (average 0.5 min, max. 1.3 min), without bottom time and with slow travel speeds (0.1–0.6 m s−1). The time spent at depth and the diet (mainly benthic fish and octopus) is consistent with benthic foraging; the function of shallow dives is uncertain. Male shags forage mainly in the afternoon in3–5 distinct bouts of diving. Within bouts (and shorter homogeneous sequences of diving) surface intervals are consistently2–3 times the preceding dive duration; in other shags the reverse is the case. Blue‐eyed shag diving depth, duration and pattern is extreme amongst shags; and the relationship between dives and surface intervals suggests that they may regularly exceed their aerobic dive limit.last_img read more

Rockhopper Exploration provides Sea Lion farm-in update

first_imgDiscussions are also continuing with the Falkland Islands Government around a possible extension to licences PL004 and PL032 Rockhopper Exploration provides Sea Lion farm-in update. (Credit: C Morrison from Pixabay) Rockhopper Exploration plc is pleased to provide the following update in relation to the previously announced farm-in to the Sea Lion project by Navitas Petroleum LP (“Navitas”).Following the announcement of the proposed merger of Premier Oil plc (“Premier”) and Chrysaor Holdings Limited, Navitas has confirmed that it remains committed to the proposed farm-in. In order to enable the merger to complete and the new management of the combined entity to make a firm decision on the Sea Lion project, Rockhopper, Premier and Navitas have agreed to extend the exclusivity period for the farm-in to the earlier of (i) 30 September 2021; (ii) the execution of definitive transaction documents, or (iii) a decision by Navitas not to proceed with the farm-in. During this period, Rockhopper’s share of Sea Lion project costs will continue to be borne by Premier under the same terms as previously announced.Discussions are also continuing with the Falkland Islands Government around a possible extension to licences PL004 and PL032 which currently expire in May 2021.Samuel Moody, Chief Executive Officer, commented:“We will work closely with all stakeholders over the coming months to maximise the chance of securing the farm out and project sanction of Sea Lion. We believe that the opportunity to invest in a 500 million barrel fully appraised and engineered project with material additional upside at this point in the cycle presents a compelling opportunity, and one which would lead us towards unlocking the value within the project long-awaited by all stakeholders.” Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee Coming to Evansville

first_imgChannel 44 News: Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee Coming to EvansvilleNOVEMBER 2ND, 2017  TYRONE MORRIS EVANSVILLE, INDIANA Former Arkansas Governor and Presidential Candidate Mike Huckabee will make a stop in the Tri-State.He’ll be in Evansville April 19th, 2018 at the Vanderburgh County right to Life Banquet.That’s the largest banquet of it kind in the nation.Huckabee will serve as the featured speaker at the event.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

Derek Trucks Wants Dickey Betts To Join Tedeschi Trucks Band At Sunshine Music Festival

first_imgA new interview with Derek Trucks came out this morning, where the slide guitarist talks about an upcoming CD/DVD that is set to release this spring featuring one of Tedeschi Trucks Band‘s performances from earlier this year. While originally planned as a compilation, Trucks explains, “the second night in Oakland felt so good we decided to make the live album that one show, and the film is us playing but also us on the road. I watched it a few times and feel like it’s a petty honest depiction of us. I like it.”Trucks also told Herald-Tribune that he is not interested in any reunion of the Allman Brothers Band, but would instead love to play with former member and co-founding Allman Brothers guitarist/vocalist Dickey Betts. “I always think about Dickey when the (Sunshine Music Festival) shows come up,” expresses Trucks. “I will definitely reach out to him. It’s that time.”The full interview, which talks about the Allman Brothers, Tedeschi Trucks and more, can be found here.last_img read more

These Christmas Decorations Mash Up Houston Rap & Are Extra AF

first_imgFor many folks, Christmas lights are a source of pride (we’re looking at you, Clark Griswold). In 2017, Texas resident Frankie To-ong really went the extra mile with his Christmas decorations, creating a full visual and sonic experience that honors Houston and the spirit of Christmas in the absolute best way possible. The soundtrack features a mash-up of tracks from Houston rappers, including Lil Keke’s “Southside,” DJ DMD’s “25 Lighters On My Dresser” and Mista Madd’s “Down South”, while the light panel shows images of stretch limos, a rapping Santa Claus, and more.Formerly a DJ, To-ong told his local news station KXAN, “The best thing about DJing is when you play the right track and the energy and the crowd gets incredible.” Hats off to you, Mr. To-ong, because you’re the hero we didn’t know we needed this holiday season.[Video: Frankie To-ong]last_img read more

Message in the dust

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Related Caroline Coolidge was stunned.The rising second-year was digging at the archaeology field school in San José de Moro, Peru, and there in the dusty dirt a small face stared up at her. She thought her eyes were playing tricks on her.“I honestly at first just thought I was imagining it because I just wanted to find something so bad,” said Coolidge, a Leverett House resident who is taking part in the summer archaeology program run by Pontifícia Universidad Católica del Perú in collaboration with the Harvard Summer School Study Abroad Program. “I thought, ‘This can’t be this intact piece of pottery.’ But I just kept brushing away. I was honestly speechless when I saw what it was.”What it was, was truly special.Earlier in the week students had unearthed fragments of ceramic vessels, a typical find at one of the oldest ceremonial burial grounds for the Moche, a pre-Columbian civilization that flourished along Peru’s northern coast between the first and eighth century A.D. But Coolidge had come up empty. “I hadn’t really found anything where I had been working,” she said. “I was excited but feeling a little bit discouraged because I wondered if I was doing this wrong.”Determined, she kept at it, using her trowel to methodically clear away dirt in the site’s northwest corner. Then, as she brushed the dried soil from what she thought was a rock, she slowly uncovered a fully intact figurine, likely from the transitional period between the Moche and Lambayeque cultures and approximately 1,000 years old. In addition to its pristine condition, what made Coolidge’s discovery so unusual was the absence of other objects nearby. “Typically, this type of artifact would be included in a burial,” she said, “but there were no burials found near it.”,Studying the cultural heritage of some of Peru’s earliest civilizations is at the heart of the field school run by Luis Jaime Castillo Butters, a visiting professor at Harvard in 2016 and professor of archaeology at Pontifícia Universidad Católica, who was recently named Peru’s minister of culture, and by Gary Urton, Harvard’s Dumbarton Oaks Professor of Pre-Columbian Studies. During the five-week program participants visit Peruvian archaeological sites and museums and learn the fundamentals of archaeological documentation and analysis. They also learn how to excavate, uncovering funerary relics and other items that point to how groups such as the Moche celebrated life and death, and how and why they flourished or failed.“We are trying to understand another culture by looking at their material remains,” said Urton, whose research focuses on pre-Columbian and early colonial Andean cultural and intellectual history. “All of these Peruvian civilizations did not have writing so we don’t have their own words … what we do have is what they lived with, what they made, what they used in their day-to-day lives. So what we try to do then with the students is have this balance between the real physical excitement of working in the field and the intellectual challenge of thinking about what it all means.”Coolidge is eager to find out more about what her figurine might mean — archaeologists at the site suspect it may have been used as a fertility offering. Urton called it “an extraordinary piece” and “one of the most complete and beautiful figurines we have brought up from here in several years.” Coolidge plans to write about the artifact for her final class project and will study its composition and compare it with similar finds at the site in recent years, she said, to determine “its cultural significance and where it fits within the region’s chronology.”On a Skype call after a long day of digging, Coolidge said the experience had helped her hone her academic focus. She said she intends to either concentrate in archaeology or make it a secondary field of study during her time at Harvard.“I knew it was going to be amazing,” she said. “But I didn’t realize it was going to be this amazing.” In interview, archaeologist who uncovered ancient site outlines what has been learned; he’ll speak at Harvard April 10 Radcliffe fellow heads a team helping preserve the ancient city of Nicomedia in modern-day Turkey Unearthing the secrets of the Aztecs Uncovering an ancient worldlast_img read more

Panel explores strategies to manage, reduce stress

first_imgWith exam week quickly approaching, Saint Mary’s students took to the Dalloway’s clubhouse for a panel on stress management sponsored by the Student Government Association (SGA).“As far as we understand tonight, the basic idea is that we’re here for you,” said panelist and Saint Mary’s life coaching consultant Becky Lindstrom. “We’re here to answer your questions, especially if you’re a first year and have never been through exams.”The panel opened with Lindstrom addressing that stress is normal, a part of life, a part of transition and a part of change.“Actually, any time you take on a new job, if you want to get married, if you want to have children, if you want to travel internationally, go abroad for a semester, these are all very fantastic, exciting things that we want in our lives and they’re also things that are going to bring us stress,” she said.Lindstrom notes that there are different kinds of stress and there are different ways of thinking about stress.“The stress that you experience when you are getting ready to take that test, that in some ways is good for you. Especially when you are actually going in to take the test because when we feel stressed it changes our body and it actually gives us more oxygen flow to our brains so we can think quicker,” she said. “It just in general sharpens our senses and makes you perform better. That’s how stress can actually be an advantage to you in situations where it makes sense that you would feel stressed.”Her biggest takeaway for students, she said, would be to know that this perspective shift alone can help reduce stress.“When you realize it’s natural to feel stressed out and it’s actually something that can benefit you when you know how to harness it, that makes you feel more in control,” she said.Lindstrom also said there is a difference between managing your stress and reducing your stress, especially in the wake of approaching exams.“We can talk about managing it because that’s totally possible. Reducing it, short of hiding under a rock for the rest of your life, is not necessarily easy to do,” Lindstrom said. “But there is one thing that you can do to reduce your stress and that is, as much as possible, be right here, right now. Don’t be a year ago where you’re kicking yourself about what you should have, could have, would have done, right? That doesn’t help. Don’t be a week or a month or a year ahead thinking about all the potential bad things that could happen if you don’t take care of this right now, cause that also doesn’t necessarily help. What’s going to help you the most in reducing your stress and helping you feel a little more ability to control it is to be very aware of the stories you’re telling yourself and when you’re going into the past or way out into the future.”Fellow panelists and Saint Mary’s students shared their stress reduction and management skills with the audience.“I basically do two major things that help me manage or reduce my stress. The first thing, I actually got into this year is meditation. So, every night before bed, I use this app called ‘Headspace.’” senior Jessie Snyder said. “Then another thing that I really try to focus on is doing self-care routines at night.”This was followed by senior Haley Mitchell, who said nature was a big part of her de-stressing, whether that be taking walks to the lake or down the nature trail on campus.Junior Kelsey O’Connor and first-year student in the audience Morgan Puglisi shared that their approach to stress management was to make lists and attend to their planners.“I would say definitely to-do list is something that helps me,” Puglisi said. “Just map out like, ‘OK, these are the things I need to do.’ Sometimes I’m like, ‘I need to do this this and this,’ and I stress my own self out. Just making a list and saying, ‘OK, one step at a time. I’m going to start with this and then I’m going to go to that.’ That really helps me make everything into a structure. When our minds go crazy, it’s nice to have that structure.”Tags: Clarissa Dalloway’s Coffeehouse, Dalloway’s, meditation, panel, self-care, stresslast_img read more

April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions

first_img Disciplinary Actions April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actionscenter_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended seven attorneys, disbarred six, reprimanded three, and accepted the resignation of two attorneys.The following lawyers are disciplined: Dominick Amento, 350 Cypress Drive, Lake Park, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective retroactive to February 28, 2002, following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) At the time of Amento’s resignation, he was under investigation for a criminal conviction for failing to report child abuse. (Case no. SC03-1944) Joseph M. Barisic, 1680 Michigan Ave., Ste. 1001, Miami Beach, suspended by emergency order from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following a January 5 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) A review of Barisic’s bank records revealed that there is clear, convincing and undeniable evidence that he misappropriated hundreds of thousands of dollars of clients’ funds. (Case no. SC03-2180) Joseph Nathaniel Baron, P.O. Box 532118, Orlando, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1971) Among several Bar violations, Baron failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to hold in trust funds belonging to a client that were in his possession in connection with the representation; neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; failed to comply with reasonable requests for information; and for failure to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case nos. SC03-490 and SC03-1009) Donald Young Bennett, 1800 Second St., Ste. 717, Sarasota, suspended from practicing law in Florida for nine months, effective retroactive to October 3, 2003, following a January 22 court order. Additionally, Bennett must contact Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. within 30 days from the order. ( Admitted to practice: 1975) Bennett engaged in the practice of law while he was a delinquent member of the Bar and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-1534) Robert William Boyd, 1813 Baillie Glass Lane, Orlando, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective immediately following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) Boyd pled guilty to felony charges of engaging in a conspiracy to commit securities fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud. (Case no. SC03-1932) Thomas William Dickson, 120 Heritage Court, Roswell, Ga., reprimanded for professional misconduct following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Dickson failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2567) Robert Jay Fenstersheib, 520 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Among several Bar violations, Fenstersheib failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case nos. SC03-384 and SC03-492) Steven K. Grover, 868 99th Ave. N., Ste. 1, Naples, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a January 15 court order. Prior to reinstatement , Grover must be evaluated by Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. (Admitted to practice: 1997) Among several Bar violations, Grover failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel; violated or attempted to violate The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or done so through the acts of another; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case no. SC03-1745) Bruce Lee Hollander, 901 S. State Road 7, Ste. 360, Hollywood, disbarred from practicing law in Florida for five years, effective retroactive to November 17, 2002, following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) On or about November 20, 2001, Hollander was convicted, by jury verdict, of one count of conspiracy, five counts of wire fraud, six counts of making false statements, and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, felonies, and was sentenced to 51 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-109) Michael Andrew Jones, P.O. Box 1881, Englewood, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Jones was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Georgia on January 13, 2003 for converting the funds of 11 clients. Among several Bar violations, Jones violated or attempted to violate The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or through the acts of another; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC03-733) Barry Jay Marcus, 7951 S.W. Sixth St., Plantation, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1990) Among several Bar violations, Marcus failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and neglected to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-1082) Keith Aloysius Martin, 2331 N. State Road. 7, Ste. 222, Lauderhill, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) Among several Bar violations, Martin neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; failed to provide competent representation to a client; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case nos. SC03-704, SC03-1098, SC03-1221, SC03-1536) Steven Edward Mirsky, One Church St., Ste. 802, Rockville, Md., suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective 30 days following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Among several Bar violations, Mirsky failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC03-484) John Arthur Racin, 10850 S. U.S. Highway 1, Port St. Lucie, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1995) Among several Bar violations, Racin failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to make reasonable efforts to ensure that the law firm in which he was a partner or shareholder had in effect measures giving reasonable assurance that all lawyers therein conform to The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-451) Paul James Schlegel, 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Ste. 910, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following a December 11, 2003 court order. Additionally, Schlegel must attend The Florida Bar’s Trust Account Workshop. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Among several Bar violations, Schlegel failed to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts and entered into a business transaction with a client or knowingly acquired an ownership, possessory, security or other pecuniary interest adverse to a client. (Case no. SC03-905) Dennis L. Stewart, P.O. Box 50970, Summerville, S.C., suspended from practicing law in Florida for three years, effective immediately following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) On or about September 11, 2001, Stewart plead guilty to one count of making a false statement on a HUD-1 settlement statement, a felony, and was sentenced to 33 months in prison. (Case no. SC02-940) Jan Peter Weiss, 370 Camino Gardens Blvd., #342, Boca Raton, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 60 days, effective retroactive to December 19, 2003, following a January 15 court order. Furthermore, Weiss will be placed on probation for three years, beginning December 19, 2003. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Among several Bar violations, Weiss committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (SC03-1531) Robert Michael Zieja, 4611 S.W. 30th Way, Ft. Lauderdale, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1982) Zieja failed to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; counseled a client to engage, or assisted a client, in conduct that he knew or reasonably should have known is criminal or fraudulent; knowingly disobeyed an obligation under the rules of a tribunal except for an open refusal based on an assertion that no valid obligation exists; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (SC03-945) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.last_img read more

How to Adjust Your Front Door in 60 Seconds With Alure Home Improvements

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Sponsored Content Brought To You By Alure Home ImprovementsJust imagine for a second how many times a day you open and shut the doors in your house. This important part of your living arrangement, like all things, is subject to wear and tear over time. For an exterior front door, it’s undergoing even more pressures due to shifts in temperature and weather as one season runs into another. It’s to be expected that it will warp and swell. There’s another factor too, as Doug Cornwell, chief operating officer of Alure Home Improvements, explains.“The entrance door is heavy!” Cornwell says in a recent installment of “Alure Home Improvements’ 60 Second Fix” titled “How To Adjust Your Front Door In 60 Seconds.” It’s got to stand up to the weather and the unwanted, so it’s made stronger and it’s insulated.“Over time they will start to weigh down and come out of level,” he warns. An uneven door puts pressure on the hinges, causing them to weaken and become misshapen.If you don’t address that spacing problem, at a certain point the door will start to creak or squeak, and, in the worst case scenario, actually get stuck or fail to shut properly. That could put you in a real jam.Fortunately, Cornwell knows what to do, and here in this new “60 Second Fix Video,” he spells out the simple steps you can take to fix this all-too common household problem.“The easiest way to check is if you first take a look at the spacing above the door,” Cornwell advises. If the space between the top of the door and the door jamb is narrower at one end than the other, it has to be fixed. If you examine the vertical gap on the side of the door where the latch  is, you’ll probably see a similarly uneven space. According to Cornwell, the most common cause of that unevenness is that the top hinge has been pulled slightly out of the door jamb due to the weight of the door.“This tells us that the door is out of whack,” says Cornwell.In this case, Cornwell intends to readjust the door’s top hinge because he’s figured out that it has pulled slightly away from the door jamb. He unscrews the top screw in the hinge and realizes that it’s too short to support the door’s weight any more, and it must be replaced with a longer screw that will anchor the hinge not only to the door jamb but to the wooden frame behind the jamb.He doesn’t need to drill a different hole for the hinge. He just inserts a longer screw into the same hole, and with the aid of hand-held power screw-driver, he quickly tightens the new screw until he can feel it dig firmly into the two-by-four frame of the house.Click here to learn more about Alure Home ImprovementsTo test it out, Cornwell goes back inside the house and closes the front door so he can inspect the spacing.“If you take a look, you’ll see that the space across the top is now more even,” he says. “That’s important on an exterior door because that also stops the air infiltration.”And we all know what that means: a higher energy bill!So, the next time you notice that your front door is unevenly spaced in the door jamb, it may be that the top hinge has slipped out of line. Thanks to Doug Cornwell at Alure Home Improvements, you now know that simplest solution could be just tightening the top hinge by replacing a short screw with a longer one that will anchor deeper into the door frame.last_img read more

Authorities report rise in scams across Broome County

first_imgSometimes, the scammers “spoof” their telephone number by making it a number identical to the number used by the sheriff’s office. (WBNG) — On Thursday, the Broome County Sheriff’s says it has received reports of scams in the area. The sheriff’s office says it will never request money regarding a warrant. If you are a victim of a scam, you’re asked to contact your local police department. In a news release, the sheriff’s office’s says victims are told they are speaking with someone from the IRS, FBI or other law enforcement agency. They say victims are asked to send money to satisfy a warrant for their arrest.last_img read more