DD LOCAL: DUNKINEELY COMMUNITY LTD LAUNCH SIX-WEEK CARPENTRY COURSE

first_imgDunkineely Community Ltd (DCL)DCL Carpentry – DCL Carpentry course with John Henderson and it will start on Wednesday 5th November for six weeks in the Dunkineely Community Centre from 7pm to 9pm. There are only two places available. This course will be part-funded by the ETB and requires a maximum of 10 people to run. Cost €30 for the 6 sessions per person. Call the DCL office on 074 9737678 or 087 3421922. DCL Interior Design – DCL Interior Design course with Sile Kelly and it will start on Wednesday 5th November for six weeks in the Dunkineely Community Ltd offices from 7pm to 9pm.This course is full but you are welcome to put your name on the waiting list in case anyone drops out.This course will be part-funded by the ETB and requires a maximum of 10 people to run.Cost €30 for the 6 sessions per person. Call the DCL office on 074 9737678 or 087 3421922. Mental Health and Suicide Awareness – Talks and Discussion led by Fr. James Sweeney, Thursdays 6th, 13th and 20th November 2014. Time: 7:30 – 9:30pm, Venue: Dunkineely Community Ltd Offices/The Manse Dunkineely. All welcome.If you are interested please sign up by Monday 3rd November at the DCL office 074 9737678 or 087 3421922 or [email protected] note the talks/discussions would not be suitable for anyone who experienced a suicide in the past year as the subject would be too raw for them.Irish Heart Foundation 5k walk – A big thank you to all who took part in the walk at Bruckless on Sunday 28th September.To all who helped in any way, the steward’s, the drivers, those who baked & helped with refreshments and whose who gave kind donations. Collection amounted to €1550. Dunkineely Community Ltd (DCL) – Has a library of over 500 books from Children’s Literature, Teenage Fiction (The Fault in our stars), Classics (Jane Austen – Pride and Prejudice), Horror, Comedy, Booker-Prize etc. Rent a book from just 20c.Come into the office weekday mornings from 9:30 am – 12:30 pm and use the Internet (20c per half hour) or print or photocopy documents (20c per page).DD LOCAL: DUNKINEELY COMMUNITY LTD LAUNCH SIX-WEEK CARPENTRY COURSE was last modified: October 24th, 2014 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:DD LocalDunkineely Community LTDFeaturesnewsNoticeslast_img read more

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Genes of extinct Caribbean islanders found in living people

first_img Email Genes of ‘extinct’ Caribbean islanders found in living people The skeletal remains come from a site called Preacher’s Cave on Eleuthera, an island in the Bahamas. Archaeologists began excavating there in the early 2000s to probe the Bahamas’ first European arrivals: Puritans who took refuge in the cave after a shipwreck. As they dug, they also found older artifacts associated with the island’s precontact indigenous culture, including a handful of well-preserved burials.At the time, Hannes Schroeder, an ancient DNA researcher at the Natural History Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen, was on the lookout for skeletons from the Caribbean he could test for DNA—even though he knew success was a long shot. DNA deteriorates faster in hot, humid environments than it does in cold, dry ones. Hunting for ancient DNA in the Caribbean “was uncharted waters,” he says. He tested teeth from five of the Preacher’s Cave burials, and in the end just one had DNA intact enough to sequence. But by the standards of ancient DNA from the tropics, that tooth was a bonanza.It belonged to a woman who lived about 1000 years ago, according to radiocarbon dating. Schroeder’s team sequenced each nucleotide base of her genome an average of 12.4 times, providing the most complete genetic picture of a precontact Taino individual to date, they report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. “It’s a feat of working with tropical samples,” says Maria Nieves-Colón, a geneticist who studies ancient and modern Caribbean populations at the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity in Irapuato, Mexico, and at Arizona State University in Tempe. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Lizzie WadeFeb. 19, 2018 , 3:00 PM Vibert Cambridge Jorge Estevez grew up in the Dominican Republic and New York City hearing stories about his native Caribbean ancestors from his mother and grandmother. But when he told his teachers that he is Taino, an indigenous Caribbean, they said that was impossible. “According to Spanish accounts, we went extinct 30 years after [European] contact,” says Estevez, an expert on Taino cultures at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, who is based in New York City.Many scientists and historians continue to believe the Taino were wiped out by disease, slavery, and other brutal consequences of European colonization without passing down any genes to people in the Caribbean today. But a new genetic study of a 1000-year-old skeleton from the Bahamas shows that at least one modern Caribbean population is related to the region’s precontact indigenous people, offering direct molecular evidence against the idea of Taino “extinction.”“These indigenous communities were written out of history,” says Jada Benn Torres, a genetic anthropologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville who studies the Caribbean’s population history and has worked with native groups on several islands. “They are adamant about their continuous existence, that they’ve always been [on these islands],” she says. “So to see it reflected in the ancient DNA, it’s great.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Jorge Estevez and other members of the Higuayagua Taino community dance at a festival in New York City. Taino groups have fought against the idea that indigenous Caribbean islanders died out after European contact. The Taino woman’s DNA shores up archaeological evidence about her ancestors and her culture. When Schroeder’s team compared her genome to those of other Native American groups, they found she was most closely related to speakers of Arawakan languages in northern South America. Early Caribbean ceramics and tools are strikingly similar to ones found in excavations there, archaeologists have long argued.The two lines of evidence suggest that about 2500 years ago, the woman’s ancestors migrated from the northern coast of South America into the Caribbean, rather than reaching the islands via the Yucatán Peninsula or Florida. It seems that once people arrived, they didn’t stay put. Archaeologists know that ceramics and other goods were traded between islands, indicating frequent trips. Moreover, the Taino woman’s genome doesn’t contain long repetitive sequences characteristic of inbred populations. Her community, therefore, was likely spread out across many islands and not confined to 500-square-kilometer Eleuthera. “It looks like an interconnected network of people exchanging goods, services, and genes,” says William Schaffer, a bioarchaeologist at Phoenix College who helped excavate the remains in Preacher’s Cave.Genetic studies of modern populations have found that many people from Puerto Rico, Cuba, and several other Caribbean islands carry significant indigenous ancestry, in addition to genes inherited from European and African populations. Still, it’s possible that these living people descend not from the Taino, but rather from other Native Americans who, like many Africans, were forcibly brought to the islands as slaves. But when Schroeder compared the genomes of modern Puerto Ricans to the ancient Taino woman’s genome, he concluded that they descend in part from an indigenous population closely related to hers. “It’s almost like the ancient Taino individual they’re looking at is the cousin of the ancestors of people from Puerto Rico,” Nieves-Colón says. Growing up in Puerto Rico, she, like Estevez, was always told that the Taino died out. “You know what? These people didn’t disappear. In fact, they’re still here. They’re in us.”Estevez, who founded the cultural organization Higuayagua Taino of the Caribbean, didn’t need an ancient DNA study to tell him who he is. Thanks to his family’s oral history and cultural practices, he says, he has always had a strong connection to his indigenous ancestry. But he hopes the new study will convince skeptics that Taino people are alive and kicking. “It’s another nail in the extinction coffin,” he says.last_img read more

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