April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions

first_img Disciplinary Actions April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions April 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actionscenter_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended seven attorneys, disbarred six, reprimanded three, and accepted the resignation of two attorneys.The following lawyers are disciplined: Dominick Amento, 350 Cypress Drive, Lake Park, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective retroactive to February 28, 2002, following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) At the time of Amento’s resignation, he was under investigation for a criminal conviction for failing to report child abuse. (Case no. SC03-1944) Joseph M. Barisic, 1680 Michigan Ave., Ste. 1001, Miami Beach, suspended by emergency order from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following a January 5 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) A review of Barisic’s bank records revealed that there is clear, convincing and undeniable evidence that he misappropriated hundreds of thousands of dollars of clients’ funds. (Case no. SC03-2180) Joseph Nathaniel Baron, P.O. Box 532118, Orlando, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1971) Among several Bar violations, Baron failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to hold in trust funds belonging to a client that were in his possession in connection with the representation; neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; failed to comply with reasonable requests for information; and for failure to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case nos. SC03-490 and SC03-1009) Donald Young Bennett, 1800 Second St., Ste. 717, Sarasota, suspended from practicing law in Florida for nine months, effective retroactive to October 3, 2003, following a January 22 court order. Additionally, Bennett must contact Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. within 30 days from the order. ( Admitted to practice: 1975) Bennett engaged in the practice of law while he was a delinquent member of the Bar and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-1534) Robert William Boyd, 1813 Baillie Glass Lane, Orlando, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective immediately following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) Boyd pled guilty to felony charges of engaging in a conspiracy to commit securities fraud, mail fraud and wire fraud. (Case no. SC03-1932) Thomas William Dickson, 120 Heritage Court, Roswell, Ga., reprimanded for professional misconduct following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Dickson failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC02-2567) Robert Jay Fenstersheib, 520 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., Hallandale, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Among several Bar violations, Fenstersheib failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case nos. SC03-384 and SC03-492) Steven K. Grover, 868 99th Ave. N., Ste. 1, Naples, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a January 15 court order. Prior to reinstatement , Grover must be evaluated by Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. (Admitted to practice: 1997) Among several Bar violations, Grover failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel; violated or attempted to violate The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or done so through the acts of another; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case no. SC03-1745) Bruce Lee Hollander, 901 S. State Road 7, Ste. 360, Hollywood, disbarred from practicing law in Florida for five years, effective retroactive to November 17, 2002, following a December 18, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) On or about November 20, 2001, Hollander was convicted, by jury verdict, of one count of conspiracy, five counts of wire fraud, six counts of making false statements, and one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering, felonies, and was sentenced to 51 months in prison. (Case no. SC03-109) Michael Andrew Jones, P.O. Box 1881, Englewood, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Jones was disbarred by the Supreme Court of Georgia on January 13, 2003 for converting the funds of 11 clients. Among several Bar violations, Jones violated or attempted to violate The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or through the acts of another; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC03-733) Barry Jay Marcus, 7951 S.W. Sixth St., Plantation, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1990) Among several Bar violations, Marcus failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and neglected to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-1082) Keith Aloysius Martin, 2331 N. State Road. 7, Ste. 222, Lauderhill, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a January 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) Among several Bar violations, Martin neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; failed to provide competent representation to a client; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case nos. SC03-704, SC03-1098, SC03-1221, SC03-1536) Steven Edward Mirsky, One Church St., Ste. 802, Rockville, Md., suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective 30 days following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Among several Bar violations, Mirsky failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC03-484) John Arthur Racin, 10850 S. U.S. Highway 1, Port St. Lucie, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1995) Among several Bar violations, Racin failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to make reasonable efforts to ensure that the law firm in which he was a partner or shareholder had in effect measures giving reasonable assurance that all lawyers therein conform to The Florida Bar Rules of Professional Conduct; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-451) Paul James Schlegel, 100 W. Cypress Creek Road, Ste. 910, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following a December 11, 2003 court order. Additionally, Schlegel must attend The Florida Bar’s Trust Account Workshop. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Among several Bar violations, Schlegel failed to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts and entered into a business transaction with a client or knowingly acquired an ownership, possessory, security or other pecuniary interest adverse to a client. (Case no. SC03-905) Dennis L. Stewart, P.O. Box 50970, Summerville, S.C., suspended from practicing law in Florida for three years, effective immediately following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) On or about September 11, 2001, Stewart plead guilty to one count of making a false statement on a HUD-1 settlement statement, a felony, and was sentenced to 33 months in prison. (Case no. SC02-940) Jan Peter Weiss, 370 Camino Gardens Blvd., #342, Boca Raton, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 60 days, effective retroactive to December 19, 2003, following a January 15 court order. Furthermore, Weiss will be placed on probation for three years, beginning December 19, 2003. ( Admitted to practice: 1980) Among several Bar violations, Weiss committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (SC03-1531) Robert Michael Zieja, 4611 S.W. 30th Way, Ft. Lauderdale, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a January 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1982) Zieja failed to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; counseled a client to engage, or assisted a client, in conduct that he knew or reasonably should have known is criminal or fraudulent; knowingly disobeyed an obligation under the rules of a tribunal except for an open refusal based on an assertion that no valid obligation exists; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (SC03-945) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.last_img read more

Sobriety checkpoint planned in Jennings County

first_imgJennings County, In. — Indiana State Police have announced a sobriety checkpoint at an undisclosed location in Jennings County Thursday, September 21. Motorists are asked to have driver’s license and registration information available, the procedure will only take a few minutes if further investigation is not required.To help to ensure your weekend is safe and enjoyable, observe the following tips:Plan ahead and always use a designated driver.Don’t get behind the wheel of a vehicle if you’ve been consuming alcoholic beverages; call a taxi, a family member, or friend who has not been drinking to give you a ride.If you are hosting a party, always offer alcohol-free beverages and make sure all of your guests leave with a sober driver or allow them to spend the night.Remember, Friends Don’t Let Friends Drive Drunk.  Take the keys and never let a friend leave your sight if you think that they are about to drive while impaired.Sobriety checkpoints are designed to remove drivers from the roadways that are impaired or posing danger to others.last_img read more

Miami-Dade County Sued Over Immigration Policy

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of University of Miami The University of Miami School of Law’s Immigration Clinic has filed a federal suit against Miami-Dade County for illegally detaining a U.S. citizen under its controversial jail policy of holding people in lockup for immigration authorities.The suit, filed on behalf of an 18-year-old US citizen, asks Miami-Dade County and County Mayor Carlos Gimenez for monetary damages.The lawsuit, joined by the law firm of Kurzban, Kurzban, Weinger, Tetzeli & Pratt, P.A. and the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, challenges Miami-Dade County’s policy of detaining people beyond the end of their criminal custody solely for a suspected civil immigration violation.Adopted by Mayor Gimenez on January 26, 2017, the immigration detainer policy violates the U.S. Constitution, including the prohibition against unlawful seizures under the Fourth Amendment and the guarantee of due process under the Fourteenth Amendment, according to the filing. Florida law also prohibits jail officials from detaining people for civil immigration purposes.Garland Creedle was jailed at Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center after police arrested him after an alleged domestic dispute. Creedle paid his bond shortly after he was arrested, but county jail officials failed to release him and instead held him for immigration officials. No criminal charges were ever filed in court against Creedle.Miami-Dade County has been detaining people in jail for federal immigration enforcement officials ever since President Trump threatened in January to cut off funding for cities deemed “sanctuary cities.”Creedle was born in Honduras to a U.S. citizen father and has been a U.S. citizen since birth. Immigration authorities have been aware of Creedle’s U.S. citizenship since 2015, when they filed a motion to terminate immigration court proceedings against Creedle because he is a U.S. citizen.“The Mayor and County Commissioners failed to listen to our community’s overwhelming opposition to this immigration jail policy,” said Rebecca Sharpless, attorney for Garland Creedle and director of the Immigration Clinic at Miami Law. “Mixing our local criminal justice system with federal immigration enforcement is not only bad policy, it is illegal. We are all now paying the price.”Copyright 2017 – Caribbean National Weekly Newslast_img read more

Joe Maddon explains Carl Edwards Jr. demotion, Pedro Strop faith ahead of Cubs’ deadline

first_imgSAN FRANCISCO — Since arriving here for a three-game set against the Giants, Joe Maddon has shared his contrasting outlooks on a pair of Cubs relievers who have gone from bullpen anchors to liabilities over the past few months.For one of the struggling pitchers, the manager offered sharp criticism. For the other, he expressed optimism of an immediate turnaround. So while president of baseball operations Theo Epstein is reportedly prepared to enter the trade market for bullpen help, the team’s best avenue to bolstering its late-inning group may be from within. On that front, patience is all the club can try to exchange for results.Strop is still in the big leagues working through his struggles, which the Cubs are anxious to see subside. Edwards, too, could re-emerge if he regains his organization’s trust.”He’s a guy I felt really good about giving the ball to in the seventh (game) of the (2016) World Series,” Maddon said. “That actually happened, it’s not imagination. … But you’ve got to be brutally honest sometimes to get where you want to go.” Carl Edwards Jr. did not pass Maddon’s feel test one outing after returning from the IL on Friday. Edwards hit a batter, walked another and surrendered an RBI single in a third of an inning Sunday, prompting his demotion to Triple-A. “There’s something missing there, and he’s got to find it,” Maddon said. “He can still be a (top reliever), no question. But again, when we talk about feel and what we’re seeing right here … it doesn’t appear that’s on the horizon. For us to get where we want to go, we can’t have that right now.”Pedro Stop, meanwhile, has held onto his manager’s late-inning trust despite giving up three runs to the Giants in the eighth frame of Monday’s 5-4 defeat. Maddon told reporters afterward he expects Strop “to be normal” soon and that the right-hander has been unlucky of late.”I really believe in Pedro,” Maddon said.The Cubs (54-46) hope at least one of Edwards or Strop can return to form soon to help them weather a tough playoff chase and potential October appearance.MORE: Watch live MLB games all season long on fuboTV (7-day free trial)Edwards has a 5.87 ERA this season and a 2.63 mark in 13 2/3 innings since May 6, when he was called up following an April demotion. Strop has a 5.47 ERA this season and a 7.47 mark in 15 2/3 innings since that date. Strop’s positive track record in Chicago runs deeper, though: He has been a top relief arm since midseason in 2013, whereas Edwards broke through in 2016.Maddon noted Strop’s history with the Cubs in his explanation of how he has approached the two.”The difference is the body of work,” Maddon said. “Don’t underestimate the body of work and the presence and everything else.”Edwards has not commented publicly since being sent back to Triple-A, where he spent a month earlier in the year.  Strop, on the other hand, said “it’s really good to hear” his manager hasn’t given up on him yet amid his continued shakiness on the mound.Edwards and Strop aren’t Chicago’s only bullpen concerns, of course. Brad Brach has a 6.05 ERA and midseason signing Craig Kimbrel has been slow to find a groove. Brach gave up the walk-off home run to Pablo Sandoval on Tuesday night.But the contributions of Edwards and Strop to the Cubs’ recent success have made their downturns particularly jarring. Neither pitcher has finished a full season in the organization with an ERA above 3.75. Most years, they’ve been much better than that.last_img read more