Butch James injury

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Bath Rugby Butch JamesBath Rugby can confirm that Butch James has undergone surgery to stabilise his right shoulder, and is expected to be back in November.center_img Head coach, Steve Meehan, said “It is always frustrating to lose a player of Butch’s influence, but we will make sure he receives the best care and attention to get him back with the squad as and when he’s ready.”last_img

Elliot Daly starts for Wasps

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 15 Mark van Gisbergen14 Richard Haughton13 Elliot Daly12 Riki Flutey11 Jack Wallace10 Dave Walder9 Joe Simpson1 Tim Payne2 Tom Lindsay3 Ben Broster4 Simon Shaw5 Joe Launchbury6 John Hart (c)7 Sam Jones8 Dan Ward-Smith16 Joe Ward17 Bob Baker18 Zak Taulafo19 James Cannon20 Billy Vunipola21 Jonah Holmes22 Seb Jewell23 Josh Lewsey Two more rising England stars, Billy Vunipola and Jonah Holmes are named on the bench while Josh Lewsey also returns for Christian Wade who has a leg strain.London Wasps interim Director of Rugby Leon Holden said: “The obvious issues that we have had with injuries has given us the opportunity to introduce a number of our very exciting younger players.  These players have shown over the season that they are capable at this level and it will be another test for them. We can in no way underestimate the determination that Leeds will bring to the game and any team playing for their Premiership survival are going to be very dangerous.”LONDON WASPS TEAM TO PLAY LEEDS TAGS: Wasps London Wasps have made five changes to their starting team to face Leeds Carnegie in the Aviva Premiership at Adams Park on Sunday 17th April, KO 3PM.With a lengthy injury list, Holden has turned to some of the club’s young rising stars to help get the team back to winning ways.In the backs a duo of young guns are named – with Jack Wallace on the wing and Elliot Daly in the centre.Wallace takes the place of David Lemi who is injured, and both he and Daly are eligible to play for the England U20s this summer at the Junior World Cup – with Daly returning to the club following his superb display with his school in the recent Daily Mail Cup final played at Twickenham.Up front another young player, Tom Lindsay, who scored a try in last week’s Amlin Challenge Cup game against Harlequins, replaces Rob Webber in the number two shirt. Webber has this week undergone surgery for an injury to his arm and will miss the remainder of the season.John Hart also returns to the starting line-up at number 8 and captains the side, while Sam Jones, another England U20 star, plays at openside flanker – those two replacing Andy Powell and Serge Betsen who are both carrying knocks.last_img read more

Tigers team for final

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Craig Newby and Steve BorthwickLeicester Tigers have announced their matchday squad for the Aviva Premiership Final against Saracens at Twickenham on Saturday.Tigers director of rugby Richard Cockerill includes 16 survivors of last season’s final in the squad, including back-rower Craig Newby who leads out the team at Twickenham.There is only one change of personnel in the starting XV from the semi-final victory over Northampton Saints, with Horacio Agulla named on the wing, allowing Matt Smith to move to centre in the absence of the suspended Manu Tuilagi. UNSPECIFIED, UNDATED: In this composite photo illustration, Captains Craig Newby of Leicester Tigers and Steve Borthwick of Saracens pose ahead of the AVIVA Premiership Final, between Leicester Tigers and Saracens at Twickenham Stadium on May 28, 2011. (Photo Illustration by David Rogers/Getty Images for Aviva)center_img Leicester Tigers (v Saracens, Aviva Premiership Final, Twickenham, Saturday 3.00pm)15 Scott Hamilton14 Horacio Agulla13 Matt Smith12 Anthony Allen11 Alesana Tuilagi10 Toby Flood9 Ben Youngs1 Marcos Ayerza2 George Chuter3 Martin Castrogiovanni4 Steve Mafi5 George Skivington6 Tom Croft7 Craig Newby (c)8 Jordan CraneReplacements16 Rob Hawkins17 Boris Stankovich18 Dan Cole19 Ed Slater20 Thomas Waldrom21 James Grindal22 Jeremy Staunton23 Billy Twelvetreeslast_img read more

How Australia woke from their scrum nightmare

first_imgIn their three 2015 World Cup matches to date, Australia have won 19 scrums and lost just one (against Fiji). They have conceded a mere five scrum penalties and forced 13. Six of those came against England on Saturday evening and Stuart Lancaster had to substitute Marler before the referee sent him to the sin-bin.Golden chance: Australia’s scrum is now an attacking weapon. (Photo Getty Images) What the players say about LedesmaAustralia prop James Slipper: “Mario has a philosophy of how he wants the scrum, and it is about training on that, challenging each player to become better. It pushes the overall performance when everyone is at it. We’ve been worked hard on the scrum, but we have to keep improving as it’s such an important part of the game now.”Prop Scott Sio: “He has brought a great scrum philosophy to the team and the main thing is that everyone has bought into it as a big playing group and a collective. It’s an area that everyone has targeted for a few years now, so we knew we had to combine together to make it a strength of the team. It is steadily improving.”Scrum-half Will Genia: “The boys have been working very hard on it (scrummaging). Obviously we identified it as an area to improve on and Mario has done an exceptional job on changing their focus and their attitude. I think it’s showing on the field. There were bad times but I think moving forward we’re in the right place.” England prop Joe Marler was then penalised for not scrummaging straight, Bernard Foley kicked the three points and Australia were 20-3 up, with their foot on England’s throats.The rest is history, which English readers will prefer not to dwell upon, but the subject of Australia’s scrum is now extremely relevant to everyone with a Welsh connection, as the men in red take on the Green and Gold this Saturday (Twickenham, 4.45pm) in a match which will decide who wins Pool A.You don’t need a long memory to recall the days when Australia’s scrum was a laughing stock, so how come Moore now sees it as a serious attacking weapon?Super Mario is the key figure – no, not Nintendo’s heroic plumber, rather Argentina’s former hooker Mario Ledesma. Cheika’s mateAustralia head coach Michael Cheika gave Ledesma a call after his team had lost three of their four Tests on their 2014 tour, asking him to take over as forwards coach.What’s all the fuss about? Ledesma doesn’t know! (Photo: Getty Images)Ledesma had played 84 Tests in the Argentina front row between 1996 and 2011, a time when Argentina’s scrum was the fulcrum of their game. He and props Rodrigo Roncero and Martin Scelzo helped take the Pumas all the way to the World Cup semi-finals in 2007, while Ledesma also won France’s Top 14 title with Clermont Auvergne in 2010.After retiring from playing in 2011, he worked as scrum coach under Cheika at Stade Francais. He had a less successful time as forwards coach at Montpellier, but Cheika still rated Ledesma highly enough to add him to his Wallabies staff this year.The former Puma worked with the Waratahs during the 2015 Super Rugby season and set out his intentions for the national team ahead of the Rugby Championship.“What we are trying to do here, and I think we did it really well during the Super Rugby, is change that perception everyone has of the Australian team,” Ledesma said, in June. “If you look at most of the Australian teams throughout the competition, they were dominating in the scrums, especially the Reds. We had a really good run with the Waratahs too and I thought the Brumbies did really good. It’s just showing everybody that we’re there to scrum, and we want to contest. We want to dominate over there and we want the least amount of penalties possible and get the ref out of the picture.” Puma powerThe trademark of Argentina’s bajada – or method of scrummaging – is a co-ordinated eight-man push, with all eight forwards flexing their knees downwards in unison and exploding forward together to try to drive over the ball. Even after a few short months, the work Ledesma has done with the Australia pack has certainly wrought a monumental improvement. Great for the eight: Australia celebrate a scrum penalty v England (Photo: Getty Images). center_img From chumps to champsLedesma says Australia’s scrum is still very much a work in progress. Asked after their 2015 World Cup opener against Fiji if he was happy about their work in the tight, the 42-year-old replied: “Not necessarily in what we are doing on the field, but more in the journey we started together a couple of months ago, in getting the boys to understand that the mindset is really important in terms of the scrum and having everyone knowing what we’re doing, why we’re doing it and what the outcome should be.”He says the fact he was “15,000 miles away” when Australia’s scrum was beset by its past problems, helps him make the necessary changes. “I don’t have all those ghosts in my mind so I just started working with them and they have been great from the start so that’s all I know about Australia’s scrum and all I want to think of.”Cheika is happy with the progress Ledesma has made so far, although he emphasises that the hard work his forwards are putting in must continue. “We got beaten well in a fair few scrums last year here (at Twickenham), in a few important scrums, and we knew we had to make adjustments to our own scrum, not relying on anyone’s interpretation of scrums or relying on the opposition doing something different. Not just by developing a new tactic or some miracle but by working hard,” says the head coach.“The scrum is a very humbling part of the game. You can dominate one day and get your pants pulled down on another.”In the front line: How will Wales cope on Saturday? (Photo: Getty Images) Wales – you have been warned! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Go back a couple of years, or even just one, and the idea of Australia opting to take a scrum when awarded a free-kick against England would have been laughable. But that’s exactly what Wallabies skipper Stephen Moore did 48 minutes into last weekend’s clash at Twickenham. last_img read more

There’s no winning in whining

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS June 14, 2012 at 8:06 am Does some of this same principle apply to certain Vestry members….? This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York (The Rev.) Ronald L. Reed says: [Religion News Service] I was sitting in a new neighborhood restaurant with a disappointing breakfast of weak coffee and cold French toast.I opened Facebook on my iPad and posed a quandary: I want this restaurant to make it because our neighborhood needs more. Should I tell the proprietor about my experience? I know most people don’t welcome critique. Should I bother?The verdict from my small slice of the Facebook universe was to tell him. Otherwise, as one put it, “how will he know?”OK, that makes sense. Yet, still I hesitated. Not because I dreaded a confrontation — I live in Manhattan, after all, where confrontation is a way of life. I also know firsthand how cruel it is to withhold information that a person could use to improve their performance.Why did I hesitate? I think I am tired of all the whining I hear. Ours has become a culture of whining, and I didn’t want to be part of it.People bristle at the slightest discomfort or shortcoming. If they don’t get their way, they lash out. If the line is too long, the traffic too slow or the elevator too full, they whine.People stand in the grocery aisle surrounded by enough food to feed many villages and whine about the lack of one specific product. People whine about bosses, colleagues, and the unidentified “they.”In the techno-blogger world, people whine about the new Microsoft operating system, a minor change in the iPhone screen size, or Timeline on Facebook.Religious people whine about other points of view. The pope is whining about nuns. Right-wing Christians whine about uppity women. In left-wing circles, the elderly whine about change and losing control to younger constituents.In politics, everybody is whining. What a farce our campaigns have become. Attack trolls spot the slightest off-word and pounce in instant outrage, as if the nation were being invaded.In a store, one uber-mom was whining to her son about the price of camp equipment. A daughter was whining to her dad.Do we all feel that helpless? Is our addiction to control so granular that we cannot tolerate anything out of order?As I reflected on my weariness with whining, eight Russian tourists entered and filled the restaurant with noise. It dawned on me that we are a crowded breed. Living in congested cities and suburbs, driving congested highways, seeking work in a crowded marketplace, under assault by advertisements and bright lights, our privacy is made marketable and our interests are manipulated.Yes, in some ways we are helpless. The greedy will not rest until they have pillaged our entire culture. We are indeed not in control. In a way, our childlike whining makes sense, because we are being treated as wayward children, not as responsible adults capable of making our own decisions.As the song says, if there be peace, let it begin with me. I don’t have to like all that I see. I can choose not to feel threatened by a world beyond my control. I can choose to tolerate. I can choose to make room for others. Getting my way won’t improve the situation, nor will it improve my life.In short, I don’t have to whine.I did tell the proprietor about the coffee and cold meal. I told him I wanted him to succeed and thought this information would help. He was grateful. He said the hotel next door sends many Eastern European guests for breakfast, and they prefer weak coffee.“I will make a cappuccino for you next time,” he said.— Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter @tomehrich.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Rector Bath, NC June 13, 2012 at 8:00 pm I don’t remember the coffee in Russian being weak, and I think I would remember — I love strong coffee.I appreciate your decision to speak with the proprietor. It IS love when you are truly trying to help someone, to tell them how they can improve. That is not whining, it’s caring — for them, and their future customers. Rector Martinsville, VA The Rev. Judith Jones, Vicar says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Jason Lacey says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska July 9, 2012 at 9:45 pm Most reflexive people live somewhere between assertion and accommodation. “What is the loving thing to do? Where do “I” stop and “you” begin? Thus, begins the daily work of discernment in a world more complex with every dawn. All I know is to pray, listen, reflect, and act and move on to the next episode in my daily work as a Chief Ranger at a Virginia State Park. A new creation arises with each new encounter. A visitor seeking knowledge? Confirmation? Affirmation? An air conditioned moment at the visitor center? Who knows, at first? But then comes the moment, usually. A connection, a smile, an earnest effort to clarify, explain, describe, or just quietly facilitate the visitor experience itself? Usually the experience is just right or I am not told otherwise. But Sometimes I am told that the “coffee is weak” and the “French toast is cold.” And that is when I know someone really cares about my work and wants me to improve. And the blessing is that I really do, too! Thanks, Fr. Ehrich, for framing that for me. Tom Sramek Jr says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit an Event Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 13, 2012 at 7:12 pm I don’t know exactly what but there is some kind of wonderful metaphor lurking under cover of weak coffee and a restaurant’s appealing to its foreign customers. . . . Comments are closed. Rector Albany, NY Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Chris Arnold says: There’s no winning in whining Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel June 13, 2012 at 1:57 pm Dear Tom,You are correct: people do whine a great deal. People also have valid opinions and viewpoints, and valid complaints. How are we to tell the difference? And how are we to distinguish between the two without seeming contemptuous or dismissive of valid concerns? As somebody who is occasionally critical of the rapid pace of change in our church and the chaotic politics in our society, I’d like to think that I can voice my concerns without it being described as whining. Can you offer a way to tell the difference? Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Samuel V. Wilson, Jr. says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books June 13, 2012 at 5:44 pm I think that the difference between whining and feedback is: Are you willing to do anything about it? In your case, criticizing your meal online and then NOT telling the owner of the restaurant would simply have been whining. As one of my colleagues notes: “Feedback is love.” If we don’t care, we won’t give feedback. However, if we simply complain to others rather than giving feedback to those who could do something about it or, better yet, doing something about it ourselves, all we are are doing is whining. The Rev. Elaine H. Breckenridge says: June 16, 2012 at 10:44 pm “Feedback is love.” I appreciate that comment very much. I shall think about that as it applies to parish ministry, where I sometimes have trouble discerning the difference between whining and feedback. As for the rest of the story, how wonderful that the proprietor is flexible enough to serve both weak coffee and cappucchino! What happens in parishes is that people often whine yet do not tell us what they need/like. Honoring preferences is possible but only if leadership knows! Instead we all end up drinking a toxic cup of coffee when options could have been proivided. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (7) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Tom Ehrich Posted Jun 13, 2012 Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

La conferencia Nuevo Amanecer aborda diversos aspectos de los Ministerios…

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Ahora hay dos maneras de participar en la popular conferencia de la Iglesia Episcopal, Nuevo Amanecer: mucha gente, una familia, una conferencia que aborda los diversos aspectos del ministerio latino /hispano. Los participantes tienen la opción de asistir en persona, o de seguir las presentaciones online a distancia.Co-patrocinado por la Oficina de los Ministerios Latino/Hispanos de la Iglesia Episcopal y el Centro de Conferencias de Kanuga, Nuevo Amanecer se llevará a cabo del 27 al 30 de agosto en Kanuga, Henderson, Carolina del Norte.“Nuevo Amanecer es un evento bienal que ofrece herramientas prácticas y una red de apoyo para equipar mejor el ministerio de aquellos que trabajan dentro de la comunidad latino/ hispana, así como de aquellos que quieren pertenecer a ella”, explicó el Rdo. Canónigo Anthony Guillén, Misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para los Ministerios Latino/ Hispanos.Los oradores principales del evento son el Obispo Dan Edwards, de la Diócesis de Nevada, Víctor A. Feliberty-Ruberté, y el Rdo Simón Bautista, de la Diócesis de Washington.Se invita al clero, a los misioneros diocesanos, al personal parroquial, a los fundadores de iglesias y a los líderes laicos a ampliar sus conocimientos mediante el intercambio de mejores prácticas y la exploración de nuevos métodos de mayordomía, de crecimiento de la iglesia y de evangelización. Los participantes aprenderán estrategias e ideas para iniciar y fortalecer las congregaciones latino /hispanas.Una característica adicional de este año es el componente de una formación plena cristiana para niños y jóvenes que está diseñado para permitir que las familias asistan a esta conferencia.La novedad de este año – Nuevo Amanecer ONLINE“Hay muchas personas que no pueden participar en persona, pero que les encantaría poder participar en el aprendizaje y la conversación, así que este año estamos ofreciendo Nuevo Amanecer en línea”, explicó Guillén.Un video en vivo que parte de las sesiones plenarias, de los talleres seleccionados y de los servicios de adoración estará disponible a través del Nuevo Amanecer ONLINE.El Nuevo Amanecer ONLINE es ideal para reuniones y discusiones de grupo así como para la visualización individual.El Nuevo Amanecer ONLINE es gratuito, sin embargo, es necesaria una inscripción anticipada.Inscripción Para inscribirse con asistencia personal: http://www.kanuga.org/conference-calendar/conference-calendar-details/nuevo-amanecer1Para inscribirse para el Nuevo Amanecer ONLINE: http://www.formstack.com/forms/DFMS-nuevo_amanecer_espConozca a los oradores principalesEl Rvdmo. Dan Edwards ha servido como obispo de Nevada desde 2007. Anteriormente estuvo casi 20 años en el ministerio parroquial, sirviendo en iglesias de Georgia. Allí fundó un programa de entrenamiento de dirección espiritual, sirvió en la junta de Socios de Koinonía, una comunidad agrícola interracial, participó activamente en un proyecto de un grupo de reconciliación racial, y fue líder en los esfuerzos de organización comunitaria de la Industrial Areas Foundation. Sigue participando en el IAF en Las Vegas. Ejerció ley en Idaho durante muchos años antes de que el deseo de participar en una comunidad de fe lo llevara a la Iglesia Episcopal. Tiene una maestría en divinidad y teología sagrada en la dirección espiritual por el Seminario Teológico General.El Rdo. Simón Bautista, es canónigo de los ministerios latinos de la Diócesis de Washington, DC. Nació y creció en la República Dominicana y se mudó a Estados Unidos en 1993. Ejerce el servicio en español en la Iglesia Episcopal St. Alban en Washington DC, así como en la Iglesia de La Ascensión Gaithersburg, MD y en la Iglesia de Nuestro Salvador, en Silver Spring, MD. Ejerce como presidente de la junta directiva de Casa de Maryland, una organización comunitaria que trabaja para mejorar la calidad de vida y lucha por la igualdad de trato y el pleno acceso a los recursos y oportunidades para latinos de bajos ingresos y sus familias.Víctor A. Feliberty-Ruberté es un consultor de liderazgo, educador e ingeniero de la gestión empresarial. Desde 2002 ha servido en la Iglesia Episcopal en los ámbitos de la predicación, del desarrollo de la misión, de la formación cristiana y de las relaciones ecuménicas.Ministerios Latino/Hispanos de la Iglesia episcopal: http://www.episcopalchurch.org/latinoCentro de Conferencias de Kanuga: http://www.kanuga.org Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC La conferencia Nuevo Amanecer aborda diversos aspectos de los Ministerios Latino-Hispanos de la Iglesia Episcopal An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA center_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Press Release Service TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Posted Aug 8, 2012 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL last_img read more

Summit first step in creating a coalition against trafficking

first_imgSummit first step in creating a coalition against trafficking Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Human Trafficking Hannah Wilder says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments (2) Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA June 2, 2014 at 1:56 pm What a tragedy. It seems to be a growing problem. I’m proud that our church is speaking out and recommending actions. I appreciate especially the suggestion to simply listen to those who have been through this ordeal. Great coverage. Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Filipino survivors of human trafficking shared their stories during the May 10 Summit on Human Trafficking: Communities Mobilizing Against Modern Day Slavery in Queens, New York. Candice Sering, far right, chairperson for the New York Chapter of Gabriela-USA, moderated the panel. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service] It wasn’t until border control agents picked up Ethel Paat that she realized she was the victim of a transnational crime.A teacher with a master’s degree and a single mother of three, Paat arrived in the United States in October 2010. She’s just one of many Filipino women scammed since 2003 by a Philippines-based labor recruitment agency on the false promise of a high-paying teaching job.Paat and other survivors of human trafficking shared their stories May 10 with the more than 100 people gathered for the Summit on Human Trafficking: Communities Mobilizing Against Modern Day Slavery, a daylong conference held at St. James’ Episcopal Church in Elmhurst, New York.Organized by the Asiamerica Ministries of the Episcopal Church and the National Alliance for Filipino Concerns, the summit brought together religious and civic leaders, elected officials and the community to create awareness and to strategize involvement in the worldwide movement against human trafficking.Also, the summit was a first step in creating the Asia-America Coalition Against Human Trafficking.“We need to have a network with Asia and America, Asia being a sender and America being a destination,” said the Rev. Fred Vergara, the Episcopal Church’s missioner for Asiamerica ministries and the priest-in-charge at St. James.Beginning with a U.S.-Philippines network, the hope is that the coalition will grow to include other sending countries in Asia, including South Korea and China, added Vergara.Located in the western Pacific Ocean, the Philippines is a lower middle-income national that is home to 96.7 million people, 25 percent of them living in poverty.High rates of poverty, unemployment and underemployment, and the confluence of natural disasters, like the devastating Typhoon Haiyan that in 2013 left 6,000 people dead and more than 500,000 people displaced in the Philippines, create exploitative conditions.And despite the existence of anti-trafficking laws in the Philippines, lack of enforcement has not deterred trafficking, said Deserie Joy Arucan, the Gabriela Women’s Party national officer for education and training based in Quezon City, the largest city in the Philippines.Arucan will serve as the fledgling coalition’s point person in the Philippines.Worldwide, 21 million people, including 11.4 million women and girls, are victims of trafficking. The United States is a major destination country for men, women and children trafficked for the purposes of labor and sexual exploitation.In 2000, the U.S. Congress enacted the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act in 2000. The act, which emphasizes protections for women and children, seeks to prevent human trafficking, protect its victims and prosecute traffickers; it was reauthorized in 2013.Queens is the third most racially diverse county in the United States, with 22.8 percent of its population identifying as Asian-America and 27.5 percent as Latin. The borough sits at the western tip of Long Island and is the port of entry for both air and sea traffic into New York City.The Rev. Raynald Bonoan, rector of Holy Spirit Church in Safety Harbor, Florida, gave the summit’s keynote address. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSHuman trafficking is ubiquitous and exists wherever there’s a demand for cheap labor and sex. People who’ve been trafficked typically work in restaurants, nail salons, massage parlors, on construction sites, explained the Rev. Raynald Bonoan, rector of Holy Spirit Church in Safety Harbor, in the Diocese of Southwest Florida.Bonoan, who’s an active member of the Florida Coalition Against Human Trafficking, gave the summit’s keynote address, “A Christian call to take action against human trafficking.” People don’t seek help, he said, because they are ashamed, they feel isolated or confused, they don’t want to bring shame on their families, they’ve become dependent on their traffickers.And it’s not uncommon for human trafficking to go unrecognized, as Executive Council Member Lelanda Lee, who chairs council’s Joint Standing Committee on Advocacy and Networking for Mission, explained following the survivors’ panel.Lee and her family once assisted a family from the former-Soviet state of Georgia. The man, a former Olympic fencer, was brought over by a fencing club with the promise of a job that never materialized and Lee’s family helped the Georgians obtain work permits and green cards.“What we never understood was that they’d been trafficked,” said Lee, adding that what she’d thought was an individual case was actually part of a larger systemic problem.For its part, the Episcopal Church’s General Convention has passed five resolutions, the first in 2000, condemning human trafficking, supporting trafficking victims and calling for churchwide public education campaigns.Lee and Episcopalians nationwide have begun to form networks and to mobilize around creating awareness of the existence of human trafficking and looking for ways to assist in eradicating it.One tangible thing people can do is to listen with compassion to stories of survivors, Paat and others said.In Paat’s case, the recruitment agency looked legitimate;  graduates from the Philippines’ top universities were paying up to $20,000, the amount Paat eventually paid, to come to the United States. Ignoring her mother’s pleas for her not to go and out of a desire to provide more for her parents and her children, Paat ignored her sense that something wasn’t quite right.Then she arrived, there wasn’t a teaching job and life living under that radar began.Rather than work as a teacher, she worked as a babysitter and was “forced to do unimaginable things,” she said in tears.Once Paat was forced to share her story and she realized she’d been a victim of human trafficking, she was able to get assistance and learned that she may be eligible for a T visa, a special nonimmigrant visa for victims of trafficking.“I truly admire the U.S. government because I never thought they’d be giving us this support,” said Paat, whose case has been filed and is waiting to be heard.— Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Lynette WilsonPosted May 12, 2014 Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Comments are closed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Advocacy Peace & Justice, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN June 22, 2014 at 6:51 pm I am thankful for what the Episcopal Church is doing about this horror. However, could we stop using the euphemism “human trafficking”? Human trafficking seems to refer to the activity of taking people from one place to another. I have read where a former slave said that it is the term slave traders use. Please, we need to call it what it really is: slavery (work slavery, sex slavery, child slavery, child soldier slavery, debt slavery, etc…). Praying for the end of slavery. Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Nancy Tyner says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Nominee added to Southeast Florida bishop slate

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev. Michael J. Battle, vicar, St. Titus Episcopal Church, Durham, North Carolina;The Very Rev. Dr. DeDe Duncan-Probe, rector, St. Peter’s in the Woods Episcopal Church, Fairfax Station, Virginia;The Very Rev. Peter Eaton, dean, St. John’s Cathedral, Denver, Colorado;The Rev. John C. N. Hall, rector, St. Boniface Episcopal Church, Sarasota, Florida; andThe Rev. Allen F. Robinson, rector, St. James Episcopal Church, Baltimore, Maryland. [Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Canon Martin W. Zlatic, rector of St. Joseph’s Episcopal Church in Boynton Beach, Florida, has been added to the slate of nominees to stand for election as bishop coadjutor of the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida.The final number of nominees now stands at six after the diocesan Standing Committee announced five nominees on Oct. 14 and following a two-week petition period that led to Zlatic’s nomination.The other nominees are: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Bath, NC November 7, 2014 at 4:44 pm Allen Robinson, I am thrilled to see your name on this list! You’ve got my vote, and prayers. By ENS staffPosted Nov 6, 2014 Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Nominee added to Southeast Florida bishop slate Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Comments (1) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Elections Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Detailed information about each nominee can be found here.A bishop coadjutor is elected to replace the diocesan bishop upon retirement. The Rt. Rev. Leopold Frade, the incumbent diocesan bishop since 2000, will retire in January 2016. The election will be held in January 2015.The Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida includes 76 congregations, with approximately 38,000 parishioners, from Key West north to Jensen Beach and west to Clewiston. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing William Kolb says: Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Michael B. Curry named chair of Episcopal Relief & Development…

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Jan 8, 2015 Michael B. Curry named chair of Episcopal Relief & Development board Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY center_img Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York [Episcopal Relief & Development press release] The Right Reverend Michael B. Curry, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina, has been appointed as Chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors.  The appointment was made by the board’s Honorary Chair, The Most Reverend Katharine Jefferts Schori, Presiding Bishop and Primate of The Episcopal Church.Bishop Curry succeeds The Right Reverend Robert J. O’Neill, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Colorado, who has served since 2009.“Bishop Curry will bring vigor, passion, and insight to his work,” said Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori.  “I give thanks for his willingness to serve in this way, and pray that his ministry may help to bless the world with healing.”A key leader in The Episcopal Church and a prophetic voice for social justice, Bishop Curry joined Episcopal Relief & Development’s board in 2013.  Prior to his consecration as Bishop of North Carolina in 2000, he served parishes in North Carolina, Ohio and Maryland, implementing social development programs that improved the lives of children and youth in inner-city neighborhoods.  As bishop, in addition to championing Episcopal Relief & Development at the diocesan and Church levels, Bishop Curry plays an important role on the Task Force for Reimagining The Episcopal Church (TREC).“Serving as Chair of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors is a privilege and a responsibility that I take very seriously,” Bishop Curry said.  “I am grateful for the leadership of Bishop O’Neill in the growth, professionalization and demonstration of expertise that has solidified the organization’s standing as a global leader in development – and as something of which all Episcopalians can be incredibly proud!  I believe that the work of Episcopal Relief & Development is one of the finest and most important things we do as followers of Jesus in ​T​he Episcopal Church.  It really is a way we can all together share in God’s work of helping and healing a hurting world.”In support of Episcopal Relief & Development, Bishop Curry notably co-chaired the Advisory Committee of the church-wide NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund and spearheaded diocesan efforts in support of the campaign.  Altogether, the NetsforLife® Inspiration Fund raised $5 million over three years to grow the award-winning, flagship malaria prevention program, which to date has distributed over 11 million nets and saved the lives of more than 100,000 children under age five.“I am delighted by Bishop Curry’s appointment to chair Episcopal Relief & Development’s Board of Directors,” said Bishop O’Neill.  “I am grateful to Episcopal Relief & Development’s staff and partners for their courageous work on behalf of communities worldwide, and I look forward to seeing what creative and deeper engagement will flourish under Bishop Curry’s leadership.”Bishop O’Neill finishes his board term at the end of 2014 after eight years, including six as chair.  Under his leadership, the organization has developed and expanded through two transformative strategic plans – broadening the scope of NetsforLife®, strengthening Church capacity to respond to emergencies through the US Disaster Program and increasing focus on robust monitoring and evaluation practices.  This organizational growth has enabled Episcopal Relief & Development to secure significant grants from leading foundations, including the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and a Grand Challenges Explorations Grant funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.“In addition to taking Episcopal Relief & Development to the next level as an organization and further professionalizing our operations, Bishop O’Neill has also been an invaluable mentor to me in my role as President,” said Rob Radtke, President of Episcopal Relief & Development.  “He has created a tremendous legacy, and I very much look forward to working with Bishop Curry to build on our organizational successes, reaching more people and saving more lives through our partnerships worldwide.”Bishop Curry assumes Board leadership at an exciting time in the organization’s history, as it celebrates 75 years of healing a hurting world.  The 75th Anniversary Celebration brings together Episcopalians and friends to commemorate and engage more deeply with its work.  This celebration has been made possible by contributions from leaders across The Episcopal Church, notably outgoing Chair Bishop O’Neill.“Bishop O’Neill has served faithfully and creatively as a member and as Chair of the Board,” said Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori.  “His experience and his persistent energy have given important impetus to the 75th Anniversary we celebrate this year.  He will be missed, and as we give thanks for his service, we pray that his gifts will be offered in new ways in the years ahead.  Well done, good and faithful servant!” Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ People Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

Executive Council wraps up 2013-2015 triennial work

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis March 23, 2015 at 9:20 pm I consider the unused College of Preachers buildings at Washington National Cathedral to be an ideal location for the administration of the national Church originations. With restoration and updated engineering these could be outstanding quarters for the necessary workers of our Church and the Presiding Bishop. Washington is also a place where the work of the Church is needed when our government needs direction and encouragement.Bob Walker, Dallas, Texas Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Executive Council wraps up 2013-2015 triennial work Governance, social justice issues occupy last meeting Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Scott Slater says: General Convention, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem March 23, 2015 at 10:41 pm I agree with the comment about the College of Preachers building. It is a wonderful and beautiful building, but it needs a larger main conference room, apartments with their own bathrooms and, I am sure, rewiring for today’s technology. Given the funds being raised by the Cathedral to repair the earthquake damage it sustained, the National Church would have to be a major source of funds to restore and upgrade the College of Preachers building. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Executive Council March 2015, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Doug Desper says: Richard N. Taliaferro, Jr. says: center_img Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY March 27, 2015 at 4:00 pm I said this very thing some time ago in an ENS posting. The ego need of being in Manhattan has no real purpose anymore in these days of Skype, and the various live meeting technologies. International corporations use technology freely to be nimble in gathering people. We do, however, need a base. The National Cathedral grounds makes sense due to the Presiding Bishop’s cathedra being there and the empty College of Preachers which can be re-purposed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Comments are closed. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Structure Course Director Jerusalem, Israel March 24, 2015 at 7:49 pm I appreciate the recent work of the HOB and Executive Council. I think a status report on some of the relocation options would be fruitful at some point in the near future, and I too have thought of the former College of Preachers as an intriguing option. Comments (4) Executive Council meets March 21 in its last plenary session of the 2013-2015 triennium. The March 19-21 meeting took place in downtown Salt Lake City near the Salt Palace Convention Center, the setting of the June 23-July 3 meeting of General Convention. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City, Utah] The Episcopal Church’s Executive Council during its March 19-21 meeting here celebrated its work together and looked forward to the future.“A fair amount of energy during the gathering was devoted to issues of transition,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts said of the meeting during a press conference. “Executive Council reviewed its work of the last triennium and they made recommendations that they will pass on to the next iteration of Executive Council.”“The work of Executive Council has been full this triennium and I think they have good reason to be proud of what they have accomplished,” she added.The Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies, said during the news conference that “one thing that distinguishes this council is that throughout the triennium” they have “lent a critical eye to how the council functions and how the council can be even more effective in how it works.”Each of council’s five standing committees wrote a memo to its successor, outlining the work it has done as well as partially completed work that they recommend be continued, and the outgoing class has written a similar memo about council’s overall functioning. The terms of half of the 38 members ends this summer after the 78th meeting of General Convention.When that June 23-July 3 meeting convenes here in Salt Lake City, debates over the governance structures of the Episcopal Church, including council, will feature prominently. In one of its last acts of the triennium, council agreed to issue a response to some of the recommendations of the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church.TREC grew out of General Convention Resolution C095, which called for a committee to develop a plan for “reforming the church’s structures, governance, and administration.”“I had thought there might be some way of finding consensus around the TREC report [but] I don’t think there’s a lot of consensus around the TREC report,” John Johnson, who chaired a small group of council members that drafted the response, told council as he presented the report for its approval.Because of that lack of consensus, the committee made a few general comments about the report before responding specifically to what TREC said about Executive Council.The statement, whose final text will be available soon, said that TREC’s structural resolutions “while bold for some, follow a path often focused on saving money but without a clear vision of what mission a new structure will allow the wider church to pursue.”The statement said the council is “committed to thoughtful and bold change in the structure and governance of the Episcopal Church,” and it added that “the scope of work for TREC may not have been to present a bold new mission for the wider Episcopal Church, but we wonder with the church what this renewal might look like.”Executive Council member Deborah Stokes leads the Prayers of the People March 21 during Eucharist. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service“Is the mission of The Episcopal Church to bring the world to the church or to bring The Episcopal Church to the world and what does that look like in the 21st century?” the council asked.The Executive Council carries out the programs and policies adopted by the General Convention, according to Canon I.4 (1)(a). It is now composed of 38 members, 20 of whom (four bishops, four priests or deacons and 12 lay people) are elected by General Convention and 18 (one clergy and one lay) by the nine provincial synods for six-year terms – plus the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies. TREC called for reducing the membership to 21 “to improve its effectiveness as a board.”Council said the reduction would not improve its effectiveness. “While we understand the concern about reducing the cost of governance, we also are concerned that false economies could harm the church in the long run,” the statement said.Council divides itself into five standing committees, plus occasional subcommittees, and the statement said that much of the work of council happens in those smaller groups, “which allows Council to engage in a deep, substantive discussion on important fiduciary and missional concerns in a workable group size.”Reducing the size of council “inevitably means diminished representation and perspectives from the broader church,” the council said, adding that a smaller council would also mean “diminished capacity for fiduciary oversight.”The last meeting of convention also said, via Resolution D016, that “it is the will of this convention to move the church center headquarters” away from the building that the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society owns at 815 Second Avenue in New York. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)The final text of the resolution was significantly amended during convention debate to remove directives that would have required council to sell or lease out the entire property and relocate the church center headquarters “as soon as it is economically feasible.”Council has spent the triennium studying the implications of D016 and on March 21 council agreed to preserve and continue the work of its subcommittee on church center relocation by creating an ad hoc committee of Executive Council for the next triennium.The committee will be charged with examining the missional, strategic, and financial aspects of the location of the church center and with providing a final recommendation to the Executive Council. The charge is similar to that of the subcommittee whose work is ending.Council Member Bryan Krislock, who co-chaired the subcommittee with Fredrica Harris Thompsett, said the group’s extensive “listening process” (including a churchwide survey and individual interviews with “key stake members”) showed that “to be blunt, there’s no consensus.” The listening “revealed a deep divide among the members of the church, not just specific to members of council but to the members of the church in terms of what is the best missional strategy for the church center,” he said.Some believe a building is not needed, others said there should multiple locations, others said there should be a presence in New York area but not at the current address while others called for a more geographically central location in the United States. The “significant factions” of opinion come from all over the country, are in all orders of ministry and have all sorts of relationships with the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff, Krislock said.The subcommittee worked with professionals to analyze potential alternative sites and the cost involved in such moves. “We have excellent financial information,” Harris Thompsett told her colleagues. “We have some strategic information, but not yet the clear focus for the direction of a church center or centers.”Krislock said the subcommittee is “still grappling with the broader strategic questions about where the church center or the church staff should be located, how those interact with the costs and the best way to evaluate the financial information we’ve received and analyze it in a meaningful way to prepare a final recommendation.”The subcommittee was concerned that its work to date would be lost in the transition between triennia, he said. The group believes the work needs to continue “and we do not leave the impression that we have in essence given up.”Harris Thompsett agreed, adding “we’ve gone as far as we can go with intelligence and integrity.”When asked why the new committee would report its final recommendation to council and not to the General Convention, Krislock noted that the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society owns the New York church center property and the council, as its board of directors, is the only entity that can decide to sell it.The subcommittee will soon submit a report that is meant to be an appendix to the council’s Blue Book report. That report will not contain specifics about “geographic hunches” or financial information due to the incomplete state of the subcommittee’s work, Harris Thompsett said.In other action, council:* Affirmed the House of Bishops’ March 17 resolution calling for an independent commission to explore the canonical, environmental, behavioral and procedural dimensions of matters involving the serious impairment of individuals serving as leaders in the church. The commission, which is due to be appointed by Jefferts Schori in consultation with Jennings, is supposed to give special attention to issues of addiction and substance abuse. Council revised the 2015 budget to include $150,000 to fund the commission’s work.* Passed resolutions offered by its Joint Standing Committee on Advocacy and Networking on urging Episcopalians, governments and non-governmental organizations to oppose human trafficking, religious persecution, and climate change.* Agreed to require that all children and staff participating in the General Convention Children’s Program be vaccinated. A child may be exempted by presenting a certificate from a physician certifying that a person’s physical condition precludes one or more immunizations.The March 19-21 meeting took place at the Radisson Salt Lake City Downtown.Summaries of the resolutions council passed at this meeting are here.Some council members tweeted from the meeting using #ExCoun.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an Episcopal News Service editor/reporter. Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Executive Council, Robert Walker says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 21, 2015 last_img read more