Syracuse shut out for the first time since last October in 1-0 loss to Colgate

first_imgFor the first time since last October, Syracuse was shut out. Despite multiple shot attempts, the Orange (4-2-1) did not find an opportunity to score on Thursday evening. Colgate (2-4-0), with an early goal, kept the Orange at bay in a 1-0 win at SU Soccer Stadium.“I didn’t think we were as technically sharp as we have been the rest of the season,” SU head coach Phil Wheddon said. “We were trying to force passes at times. We gave up possession of the ball fairly easily, and they came in with a physical presence in the first half and we didn’t.”SU knew Colgate would be dangerous when it came to long-range shots. The Orange tried putting pressure on the Colgate forwards but one slipped through. Mara Cosentino found the ball passed by teammate Emily Crichlow. Her foot made contact and flew diagonally across the net, burying the ball into the back corner. “I tried to get there in time,” SU senior goalkeeper Courtney Brosnan said, “but it didn’t happen.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBrosnan tallied three saves, more than her last two games combined. Colgate’s Kelly Chiavaro saved six SU shots. One of those saves came late in the second half, after SU senior Alana O’Neil lined up for a free kick. Outside the box on the far left, O’Neil arced the ball to the crowd of Syracuse and Colgate players standing in front of the net. As the ball began to fall into the crowd, Chiavaro ran out of the goal with her arms outstretched and grabbed it before it reached Syracuse players.  “We didn’t necessarily test the goalkeeper a whole lot,” Wheddon said. “A lot of the balls she ended up getting her hands on were services into the box that were too close to the goalkeeper.”Syracuse shot six corner kicks, five of which were taken by Sydney Brackett. Colgate outshot SU 10-9. U led in fouls, with 10, to Colgate’s seven. “I think we needed to keep a cool head,” SU senior forward Alex Lamontagne said, “and not commit as many Brackett had a nifty shot in the middle of the first half. At the edge of the right side of the box, Brackett knocked the ball in the direction of the back corner of the net. It appeared the ball would roll past Chiavaro and put SU on the board, but it rolled parallel to the net and out of bounds. Midway through the first half, Colgate’s Eliza Doll fired the ball from the far boundary line, over the players in the box and to the top middle of the net. As it passed over the box, Brosnan jumped with her arms outstretched and caught the ball for the save. But that did not undo the early Colgate damage.“Maybe we underestimated them because of their record coming into this game,” Wheddon said. “We underestimated them. It’s a mistake that won’t happen again.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 7, 2017 at 11:23 pm Contact Kaci: klwasile@syr.edulast_img read more

Steve Kerr on Warriors roster changes: ‘We don’t know who we are’

first_imgWarriors coach Steve Kerr on D’Angelo Russell: “He’s going to fit right in with our group. We’re going to need him, desperately.” pic.twitter.com/r5qrMB23Ck— Ben Golliver (@BenGolliver) August 5, 2019Veteran Andre Iguodala also was traded to the Grizzlies, and Shaun Livingston was waived. Additionally, Klay Thompson will be out for the foreseeable future as he recovers from an ACL injury. “It’s so different from the last few years where we could, barring disaster, we knew we were going to win a whole lot of games,” Kerr said (via the San Jose Mercury News). “It was a lot more about preparing for the playoffs and whether we won 57 games or 65 games, it didn’t really matter that much. What a luxury to be able to say that. Related News “Now with all the new additions and the losses we’ve had, it’s really about establishing who we are as a team. We don’t know who we are. We knew who we were the last five years. It’s a brand new challenge.”With the departure of many key players, one question that remains is whether Kerr will increase Stephen Curry’s and Draymond Green’s workloads.“It’s tough to say before we even get on the floor,” Kerr said. “But I’m not throwing them out there for 40 minutes a night. I know that.” Draymond Green agrees to 4-year, $100M extension with Warriors, agent says Klay Thompson says Warriors’ dynasty is far from over: ‘It would not be smart to count the Dubs out’ While Kerr is ready for a new challenge with the players who are returning and with many young, new players, he said one area they will have to focus on is the defensive end. “I’m confident we’ll score points. We’ve added some guys who can put the ball in the basket. A bigger concern is defensively,” Kerr said. “We’ve lost really our ability to switch at multiple positions and do so with size and aggression.”As for how Kerr plans to handle the rest of his roster? He said “the first month or two will be critical in terms of establishing our identity as a team.” Warriors’ Klay Thompson speaks on knee injury, motivation for next season Coach Steve Kerr addressed the Warriors’ recent roster changes as he explained how he envisions using key players in a starting lineup that will be vastly different than the past few seasons. Kerr acknowledged that while coaching is a little different every year, “(t)his will be a lot different.” The most notable change comes with the loss of Kevin Durant, who joined the Nets in free agency this summer. Golden State managed to offset that loss, somewhat, by acquiring guard D’Angelo Russell in a sign-and-trade.last_img read more

Will the Pirates ever erect a permanent statue of Josh Gibson?

first_img“They (Nats ownership) came to me to ask whether we’d be interested in erecting a statue in my great-grandfather’s likeness on Nats’ property.” Sean Gibson said it was a no-brainer, considering Josh played several seasons in D.C., and considered the nation’s capital his “second home,” where he and the Grays played their home games in Northwest D.C. at Griffith Stadium from 1940-1948. Annual football clashes between Howard University and Lincoln University also occurred at the stadium, which was located in a Black section of D.C., near the Howard University campus. The stadium was demolished in 1965. Today, Howard University Hospital sits on the former site, while a moniker denotes the once-thriving stadium’s former existence. The stadium was also home to the NFL’s Washington Redskins and the Washington Senators baseball team.“I was fully aware of and involved in the entire process of having the statue in D.C.,” Sean Gibson told the New Pittsburgh Courier in an exclusive interview.Meanwhile, it should be known that Josh Gibson was born in Buena Vista, Ga., and moved to Pittsburgh’s North Side at age 11. As a ball player, he lived in the Hill District’s “Sugartop” section, said Sean Gibson.Notably, in 2005, the Pirates constructed what was then called Legacy Park in honor of Pittsburgh’s two successful Negro League franchises, the Homestead Grays and the Pittsburgh Crawfords, and their legendary owners and players. Statues and monikers of players such as Josh Gibson, Satchel Paige and James “Cool Papa” Bell were erected. But in 2015, Legacy Park was dismantled by Bucco ownership—providing Sean Gibson’s foundation with a chance to purchase the statues and ultimately auction them off for profit.Retired Courier sportswriter Eddie Jefferies said he’s still disappointed with the Pirates’ decision to remove the statues.“Upon learning that the Pirates had dismantled PNC Legacy Park I immediately harkened back to episodes in ‘Baseball’s Great Experiment’ (1983), where author Jules Tygiel alleges that the Pirates offered Negro League players tryouts at Forbes Field, opportunities that were subsequently and mysteriously cancelled,” said Jefferies.Meanwhile, Rob Ruck, a University of Pittsburgh history professor and author of publications related to Negro League Baseball history, said he harbors mixed emotions concerning the removal of Legacy Park.“Really, I was stunned when I heard the statues were gone,” he said, noting that the significant historical benefits that Legacy Park provided mainstream baseball fans, especially the youth, would be lost.He continued by crediting Pirates ownership for their groundbreaking management decisions related to acknowledging the Negro League ball play.“In the fall of 1988, the Pirates were the first Major League franchise to celebrate the Negro Leagues, with the 40th anniversary of the Homestead Grays Negro League Championship,” said Ruck. “The Pirates brought all the former ball players back to Three Rivers Stadium, and then-owner of the Pirates (Carl Barger) apologized for MLB’s overt racism in keeping Black ball players from joining the league. That was a groundbreaking move,” said Ruck, who’s authored “Sandlot Seasons,” an account of Pittsburgh’s rich sports history and the city’s impact on the development of the Negro Leagues.He’s also the author of “Raceball: How the Major Leagues Colonized the Black and Latin Game.” In July he published “Tropic of Football,” a book paying homage to American Samoan athletes who find success in the NFL. Retired Steelers star Troy Polamalu, the late Junior Seau and quarterback Marcus Mariota are three such Samoan success stories.In supporting the Pirates, Ruck states, “We shouldn’t be too hard on Bucco ownership. They put up banners at Three Rivers Stadium in honor of the Grays and the Crawfords. And they developed Legacy Park in honor of the Black players. They erected the statues and played videos to commemorate the great players. Yes, they really did a lot,” he said. “We have to give them credit for what they did.”Ruck noted that the Heinz History Center provides a significant display paying homage to Pittsburgh’s professional Black baseball teams, in addition to the former Homestead High-Level Bridge. “The bridge has since been renamed the Homestead Grays Bridge, and there are historical markers on the bridge depicting several of the legendary players,” he said.Ruck, 68, is a longtime Pittsburgh resident born in Iowa, but reared in Mount Lebanon. He also lived in Bloomfield, he said.  As a University of Pitt student, he had a friend who lived in Homestead. Both were intrigued by steel mill activity occurring across the Monongahela River at Homestead’s U.S. Steel Works, which was easily observed from their Oakland dormitories.“My buddy knew a little about the rich history of Homestead’s Black baseball legacy, but we couldn’t find much information when we started to research those facts. That intrigued me to learn more about those topics,” said Ruck.People like Gus Greenlee (owner of the Crawfords) and Cumberland Posey (owner of the Grays) were names that began to surface, as Ruck’s research actions began to spread. He also speaks about the Black Fives pro basketball team and Black social club-sponsored baseball teams like the Monteciellos and the Loendis who were synonymous with Black Pittsburgh sporting success.On July 12, a week before this year’s MLB All-Star Game, Sean Gibson was invited to Ben’s Chili Bowl restaurant in Northwest D.C. where a famous mural now includes his great-grandfather’s artistic image. The mural also includes President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama, Muhammad Ali, Dick Gregory, Prince and Go-Go musician and D.C. native, Chuck Brown. Bill Cosby was once featured on the eatery’s mural, but his image was removed in June 2017 amid his controversial legal issues.Sean Gibson said he was more than ecstatic that MLB supported honoring the Grays and Josh Gibson’s legacy in the nation’s capital.Ben’s Chili Bowl is a D.C. landmark known for its famous chili and beef/sausage hot dogs known as “half-smokes.” The restaurant is located on U Street and was founded in 1958 by Trinidadian native Ben Ali and his wife, Virginia. The business remains family-owned, although Mr. Ali died in June 2009. AT THIS YEAR’S MLB ALL-STAR GAME, thousands of fans, many of whom were visitors to the D.C. area, saw the Josh Gibson statue as they walked into Nationals Park. The Pittsburgh Pirates removed a number of statues honoring Negro League legends in 2015. THE JOSH GIBSON STATUE stands permanently near Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. (Photos by Timothy Cox)WASHINGTON, D.C.—When nearly 45,000 baseball fans embarked on Nationals Stadium for the 2018 Major League Baseball All-Star Game here in July, they likely noticed three statues dotting the entrance.In addition to statues paying homage to Washington baseball legends Frank Howard and Walter “Big Train” Johnson, a bronze memento of Josh Gibson also lines the entry way.The question that immediately arises is why Gibson, the legendary Negro League catcher from Pittsburgh’s Homestead Grays, is being lauded by a D.C. franchise, but the Pittsburgh Pirates currently do not have a statue in front of PNC Park paying homage to Gibson, a hometown hero?“Josh Gibson actually played for the Washington Grays when the franchise moved from Homestead to D.C.,” explained Sean Gibson, Josh Gibson’s great-grandson, a Pittsburgh native and CEO of the Josh Gibson Foundation.center_img Like us at https://www.facebook.com/pages/New-Pittsburgh-Courier/143866755628836?ref=hlFollow @NewPghCourier on Twitter  https://twitter.com/NewPghCourierlast_img read more