Syracuse shut out for the first time since last October in 1-0 loss to Colgate

first_imgFor the first time since last October, Syracuse was shut out. Despite multiple shot attempts, the Orange (4-2-1) did not find an opportunity to score on Thursday evening. Colgate (2-4-0), with an early goal, kept the Orange at bay in a 1-0 win at SU Soccer Stadium.“I didn’t think we were as technically sharp as we have been the rest of the season,” SU head coach Phil Wheddon said. “We were trying to force passes at times. We gave up possession of the ball fairly easily, and they came in with a physical presence in the first half and we didn’t.”SU knew Colgate would be dangerous when it came to long-range shots. The Orange tried putting pressure on the Colgate forwards but one slipped through. Mara Cosentino found the ball passed by teammate Emily Crichlow. Her foot made contact and flew diagonally across the net, burying the ball into the back corner. “I tried to get there in time,” SU senior goalkeeper Courtney Brosnan said, “but it didn’t happen.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBrosnan tallied three saves, more than her last two games combined. Colgate’s Kelly Chiavaro saved six SU shots. One of those saves came late in the second half, after SU senior Alana O’Neil lined up for a free kick. Outside the box on the far left, O’Neil arced the ball to the crowd of Syracuse and Colgate players standing in front of the net. As the ball began to fall into the crowd, Chiavaro ran out of the goal with her arms outstretched and grabbed it before it reached Syracuse players.  “We didn’t necessarily test the goalkeeper a whole lot,” Wheddon said. “A lot of the balls she ended up getting her hands on were services into the box that were too close to the goalkeeper.”Syracuse shot six corner kicks, five of which were taken by Sydney Brackett. Colgate outshot SU 10-9. U led in fouls, with 10, to Colgate’s seven. “I think we needed to keep a cool head,” SU senior forward Alex Lamontagne said, “and not commit as many Brackett had a nifty shot in the middle of the first half. At the edge of the right side of the box, Brackett knocked the ball in the direction of the back corner of the net. It appeared the ball would roll past Chiavaro and put SU on the board, but it rolled parallel to the net and out of bounds. Midway through the first half, Colgate’s Eliza Doll fired the ball from the far boundary line, over the players in the box and to the top middle of the net. As it passed over the box, Brosnan jumped with her arms outstretched and caught the ball for the save. But that did not undo the early Colgate damage.“Maybe we underestimated them because of their record coming into this game,” Wheddon said. “We underestimated them. It’s a mistake that won’t happen again.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 7, 2017 at 11:23 pm Contact Kaci: klwasile@syr.edulast_img read more

Kilfeacle feature in All Ireland Junior Cup final

first_imgThe big game this afternoon sees Kilfeacle feature in the All Ireland Junior Cup final.Just one Munster team has previously won the cup.They face defending Champions Ashbourne at 2 pm in Portlaoise. © IRFU Meanwhile, in the Ulster Bank League Division 2,Nenagh play Galwegians away, and Cashel take on Highfield of Cork in Spafield Cashel.Both those games kick off at 2.30last_img

Column: A different level of Tigermania this time around

first_imgNot that he’s all that bad.Remember, it was just seven months ago that Woods began his year not knowing how his game would respond to four back surgeries that limited him to 19 starts on the PGA Tour and kept him out of the FedEx Cup playoffs since 2013.Not only did he make it to the PGA Tour’s version of a postseason, he starts The Northern Trust at No. 20 out of the 125 players who qualified.He is playing well enough to win. Even so, this is one time Woods will consider it a very good year even if he doesn’t.“No doubt,” Woods said. “I didn’t know if I was ever going to play again.”And that might explain the reaction to him.It’s not just the headlines he makes for finishing 12th or the shot-by-shot TV coverage at every tournament. It’s the response outside the ropes that keeps getting bigger and louder, week after week, from Palm Harbor to Potomac, from the British Open to Bellerive.Stewart Cink described the third round at the PGA Championship as “a pretty intense environment” playing with Woods, this from a man who played with him (and often lost to him) during a time when Woods looked close to unbeatable.“I think everyone at the golf course cheers for him,” Brooks Koepka said after winning the PGA Championship at Bellerive while hearing one ear-splitting cheer after another for Woods on the back nine.Tigermania first struck in 1997 with his watershed victory at the Masters. It hit again during a stretch from 1999 through 2001, when Woods won five of six major championships and 19 out of 38 events on the PGA Tour.And now it’s back at full tilt for a guy who hasn’t won in more than five years.Some of that is because fans thought they might not ever see him play again. And some of that could be from those who wonder how much longer he’ll be around.“I think that people are more … I guess appreciative,” Woods said. “I don’t want to make that sound wrong or anything, but they know that I’m at the tail end of my career, and I don’t know how many more years I have left. But I’m certainly not like I was when I was 22. Forty-two, it’s a different ball game.”The Northern Trust is the five-year anniversary of Woods first showing undeniable evidence of back problems, dropping to his knees with spasms during the final round on his way to a runner-up finish.He had back surgery in the spring of 2014, two more in the fall of 2015 that kept him out of golf for more than a year and then fusion surgery on his lower spine — “the last-ditch effort,” he called it — in April 2017 that kept him off the PGA Tour another season.In the midst of that, there was his woeful mug shot from a Florida jail after his Memorial Day arrest on a DUI charge from a bad mix of painkillers.It was a low point, especially the arrest video. It had the look of being the end of his career.That seems a distant memory now.Woods delivered the largest crowd Tampa had ever seen for a golf tournament when he finished one shot behind at the Valspar Championship. He had Carnoustie buzzing when he had the lead for two holes during the final round of the British Open. He shot 64 in the final round at Bellerive, his lowest final round in a major and his best finish in nine years. He probably won’t hear noise like that the rest of the year, except maybe at the Ryder Cup.Woods was appointed a vice captain for the Ryder Cup in February and talked about wanting to make the team. He was No. 106 in the standings. Twelve tournaments later, he finished 11th and is certain to be a captain’s pick.It’s been a different kind of year, for sure.Woods can hear it. And he likes it.“I’ve had people into it over the years, but this has been so different,” Woods said. “We go back to how everyone received me at Tampa. That was very special, and I had not received ovations and warmth like that. I guess everyone knows I’ve struggled and I’ve had some back pain and I’ve gone through four surgeries and I’m trying to work my way back. And it’s been tough. People understand that.”Fans can relate to him more, even though he hasn’t won.Maybe it’s because he’s not winning all the time that they can relate to him more as a player instead of a machine.Woods has used the word “blessed” just about every week. He is playing again, when a year ago he had not even been cleared to swing a club. And it doesn’t hurt to get treated like a rock star everywhere he goes.It’s one thing to be looked upon with awe. That comes from winning, from the kind of dominance golf had never seen.It’s another thing to feel the love.“As I’ve said before, this has been a blessing,” he said. “But man, it’s been so special to have this opportunity. I’m certainly not taking it for granted, that’s for sure.” PARAMUS, N.J. (AP) — Tiger Woods seems to be bigger now than when he was good. In this Aug. 12, 2018 file photo Tiger Woods celebrates his birdie putt on the 18th green during the final round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at Bellerive Country Club in St. Louis. Woods is being treated as big now as when he was at his peak. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, file)last_img read more

Stewart, Storm surge past Mystics 98-82 for WNBA title

first_imgSeattle Storm forward Natasha Howard (6) and Washington Mystics forward Monique Currie (25) fight for the ball during the second half of Game 3 of the WNBA basketball finals, Wednesday, Sept. 18 2018, in Fairfax, Va. The Seattle Storm won 98-82. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) “We thought, ‘Oh, crap, what kind of year is this going to be?’” Bird reminisced.The answer came nearly four months later with a championship.Stewart led the Storm to their third WNBA title Wednesday night, scoring 30 points in a 98-82 victory over the Washington Mystics in Game 3 of the best-of-five series.Natasha Howard added career-high 29 points and 14 rebounds for the Storm. Seattle won 26 games during the regular season — 11 more than the 2017 campaign — entered the playoffs as the No. 1 seed, and swept the finals.Stewart was the league MVP and was selected the Finals MVP after averaging 25.6 points in the three games. She scored 17 points in the first half as the Storm raced to a 47-30 lead.“Stewie was just amazing,” Storm coach Dan Hughes said. “She truly was the MVP of this league. She truly was the MVP of these Finals. God blessed me with an opportunity to coach her and I will be forever grateful.”Seattle Storm forward Breanna Stewart holds and poses with the trophy with her teammates after Game 3 of the WNBA basketball finals against the Washington Mystics, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Fairfax, Va. The Storm won 98-82 and the title. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)Bird, also a member of a Seattle’s championship teams in 2004 and 2010, was certainly appreciative of the title — and the growth of the Storm’s younger players. Seattle landed Jewell Loyd and Stewart, both All-Stars in 2018 with Bird, with the No. 1 overall picks in 2015 and 2016 respectively.“Each (championship) is special in its own way, but this one is probably going to have a different meaning for me,” said the 37-year-old point guard who had 10 points and 10 assists. “There is probably no comparison to be honest. I didn’t know if I’d be playing at this point. Our team went through a rebuild and yes, I decided to stay. Once we got Stewie and Jewell, we knew we’d get to the other side, but how do you know you’re going to get to the other side this fast?”The coach sensed something brewing early in his first year with the franchise. Following the Phoenix loss, Seattle won five in a row.“I think this was our year,” Hughes said. “All year you could just see the escalation.”Elena Delle Donne scored 23 points for the Mystics. Kristi Toliver had 22 points.“Obviously, this finals didn’t go the way we wanted it. The great thing is we can still improve. We don’t feel like we peaked and this is it for us,” Delle Donne said.Washington reached the Finals for the first time in franchise history. Seattle Storm forward Breanna Stewart, back, celebrates and hugs guard Sue Bird (10) after Game 3 of the WNBA basketball finals against the Washington Mystics, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018, in Fairfax, Va. The Storm won 98-82. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) FAIRFAX, Va. (AP) — Sue Bird and Breanna Stewart fretted following the regular-season opener after the Seattle Storm lost at home to the Phoenix Mercury. “There’s been a huge transformation with the culture of this team,” said Delle Donne, who was acquired by Washington before the 2017 season. “Last year we were brand new. I didn’t know (Toliver’s’ favorite) beer. That’s a pretty important thing to know about Panda. Now I can go to the bar and order her everything she needs.Toliver, seated next to the first-team All-WNBA player, chimed in. “I’m going to need a lot tonight.”Alysha Clark had 15 points for Seattle.Washington battled Seattle and history. Since the league went to a best-of-five format in 2005, four teams trailed 0-2. Each lost Game 3. The Mystics joined that unwanted club. Poor perimeter shooting contributed. Washington finished 8 of 23 on 3-pointers in Game 3 and 11 for 60 (18.3) in the series.Despite the misfires, Washington rallied from down 18 points to trailing 72-67 with 6:49 remaining. Starting with a Stewart 3-point play, Seattle countered with eight consecutive points and pulled away.“We were up at halftime, but we knew D.C. was going to come back,” Stewart said. “It was how we countered that when things got close. That’s what really separated us again.”This is likely just the beginning for the dynamic 24-year-old forward, who won the NCAA Championship during each of her four seasons at the University of Connecticut.“It didn’t feel like my first WNBA finals closeout game,” the poised Stewart said.Bird understands her career is nearing the end, even though she remains among the league’s best. One of the league’s most decorated players also grasps the impact of her latest triumph.“This is probably going to be one of the most defining moments of my career,” Bird said.TIP-INSThe location, George Mason University, marked the third arena Washington has called home this season and the second in the playoffs. … Washington starting center LaToya Sanders sprained her left ankle diving for a loose ball in the third quarter. She was carried to the locker room and did not return. … Among those in attendance were Washington Wizards guards John Wall and Bradley Beal, University of Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma, University of Maryland coach Brenda Frese and Washington Redskins running back Derrius Guice.last_img read more