Indonesian homegrown gunship displayed at Singapore Airshow

first_img“[The CN235] can provide air support for ground troops, combat search and rescue missions, naval patrols, as well as border patrols,” Adi said in a statement on Tuesday. He added that Pakistan, the Philippines, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Senegal were potential markets for the gunship.Such African and Middle Eastern countries are among the many nontraditional markets eyed by PTDI as Indonesian businesses seek to fill global supply gaps arising from the US-China trade war.The company exported at least two planes last year — one to Thailand and one to Nepal — and is slated to ship another plane to Senegal this year.Through its participation at the air show, Adi said that the Bandung-based company was also trying to expand marketing and increase the sales of its products and services, include planes, helicopters and most recently, long-range military drones, as well as maintenance, repair and overhaul services. (nor) State-owned aircraft manufacturer PT Dirgantara Indonesia (PTDI) is displaying a CN235 gunship at the Singapore Airshow held at the Changi Exhibition Center from Feb. 11 to 16.PTDI corporate communication manager Adi Prastowo said the company was seeking to “expand marketing and increase sales of products and services” by participating at the show.He added that the CN235 gunship — a multifunctional vehicle that can carry cargo, paratroopers, medical teams and patrol squads — had been developed to meet market demand. The particular model displayed in Singapore also sported a 30-caliber machine gun. Topics :last_img read more

Italian prosecutors ‘to question PM’ over handling of virus

first_imgConte ‘not worried’ “The things I have to say to the prosecutor, I will say to the prosecutor — I don’t want to anticipate,” he said.”I will conscientiously set out all the facts of which I have knowledge. I am not at all worried.”All investigations are welcome. The citizens have the right to know and we have the right to reply.”The team, lead by chief prosecutor Maria Cristina Rota, has already questioned senior officials in Lombardy region, who say it was up to Rome to decide whether certain areas should be shut.The region’s health minister, Giulio Gallera, has said it was clear from February 23 that there were a lot of cases in the areas around Nembro and Alzano, towns in the Bergamo province.But the government failed to act, he said.Conte replied that “if Lombardy had wanted to, it could have made Alzano and Nembro red zones”.Codogno was closed on February 21. Lombardy and 14 provinces in the neighboring regions of Veneto, Piedmont and Emilia Romagna followed on March 8, and the whole of Italy shut down two days later.But a scientific committee advising the government and the national health institute had warned in early March 3 that the towns should be locked down, according to the Corriere della Sera. Prosecutors are to question Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte and the health and interior ministers over how the government handled the coronavirus pandemic, news agencies reported Wednesday.The prosecutors from Bergamo, the city in the northern Lombardy region worst hit by the virus, have launched an investigation into the crisis, which has killed over 34,000 people in Italy.They are looking in particular at why a red zone was not enforced in February around the towns of Nembro and Alzano. Regional officials and the government blame each other for the failure. Salvini denounces ‘lies’ Fifty relatives of coronavirus victims — members of the “Noi Denunceremo” (We Will Denounce) committee — filed complaints with the Bergamo prosecutors earlier Wednesday over the handling of the pandemic. It is the first such legal group action in Italy.”If it hadn’t been so disorganized, if [the province of] Bergamo had been made into a red zone earlier, perhaps the hospitals would not have been driven to collapse,” said Monica Plazzoli, whose husband Armando died of the virus.Far-right opposition leader Matteo Salvini, head of the League party which governs Lombardy, on Wednesday welcomed the investigation.”After so many lies and shameful attacks, justice has been done: those who have made mistakes must pay,” he said.Andrea Orlando of the center-left Democratic Party (PD), part of the government coalition, rebuked Salvini for using “a painful situation for propaganda”.It was normal procedure for prosecutors to speak with institutional representatives, he said. Italy was the first European country to be ravaged by the virus. The government imposed the country’s first red zone, around the town of Codogno, 24 hours after doctors discovered a patient positive for COVID-19.It went on to shut down 10 other towns, and then large areas of the north, before imposing a nationwide lockdown.Speaking to journalists on Wednesday evening, Conte said he would be interviewed by prosecutors on Friday. Topics :last_img read more

Barca title bid on rocks as Atletico upstage Messi’s 700th goal

first_imgBarcelona gave up more ground to Real Madrid in La Liga’s title race on Tuesday after being held to a 2-2 draw at home to third-placed Atletico Madrid as a late penalty from Saul Niguez cancelled out Lionel Messi’s 700th career goal.The draw meant the Catalans stayed second in the standings on 70 points and leaders Real Madrid, who have 71, will go four points clear at the top with five games left if they beat Getafe at home on Thursday.Barca went ahead at an empty Camp Nou in the 11th minute when Atletico striker Diego Costa knocked Messi’s delivery from a corner into his own net. Topics : The Catalans desperately needed to win after twice throwing away the lead to draw 2-2 with Celta Vigo on Saturday but history repeated itself as Quique Setien’s side failed to sparkle against a determined Atletico who are unbeaten since the season resumed.”It’s very hard to try and fight for the title when you drop points two matches in a row but we’ll keep going until the end,” said Barca midfielder Sergio Busquets.As well as defending with their usual steel, Diego Simeone’s side caused Barca plenty of problems down the wings due to the pace of Yannick Carrasco and their man-of-the-moment Marcos Llorente, who is enjoying a new lease of life as a forward.Belgian winger Carrasco won both penalties for Atletico, out-foxing Arturo Vidal in the first half and then proving too quick for Nelson Semedo.Saul had sent Ter Stegen the wrong way to score his first equalizer but the German guessed the right way in their second duel from the spot. The ball, however, squirmed through his hands and crept in off post.Barca coach Setien left former Atletico forward Antoine Griezmann out of his starting team for the second game in a row and turned to the 120-million-euro man in stoppage time, but the Frenchman had barely any time to provide the desired reaction. center_img Saul leveled soon after from the spot after the referee ordered a re-take when Costa’s initial penalty was saved by Marc-Andre ter Stegen who had strayed from his line.Barcelona then earned a penalty soon after the interval which Argentine Messi coolly converted for a remarkable 700th strike for club and country, only for Saul to strike again from the spot in the 62nd to earn a share of the points.”It’s a real shame and the league title is looking much harder for us with each game,” said Barca coach Quique Setien, whose side have drawn three of their six games since the campaign resumed after the coronavirus stoppage.”Dropping these points in reality pushes us further away from the title but we have to keep on working hard.”last_img read more

Google first call for upset youth: survey

first_imgNZ Herald 21 May 2014Google now beats talking to friends for young Kiwis with emotional or health problems, a survey has found.The Colmar Brunton national survey of 403 people aged 16 to 24 found that 64 per cent of young people said Google or other websites were the most common places their peers would go to “access information about sex, drugs, alcohol, depression, stress, health, etc”.Talking to friends came a distant second on 46 per cent.The online survey of Colmar Brunton’s ‘You Say’ youth panel offered young people a list of 24 health and social issues and asked which were “the biggest issues facing young people today”.Alcohol easily topped the list with 19 per cent, followed by ‘being accepted’ (12 per cent), bullying (11 per cent), self-esteem (10 per cent) and drugs (8 per cent). Ms Davis-Tana said alcohol was “a very dominant topic in the media, even on social media, and in our lives, so it’s something easy for youth to talk about”.However, when asked about a difficult time that they had been through personally, alcohol came only 12th on the list at 9 per cent. The top issues in young people’s actual lives were stress (32 per cent), self-esteem and relationships (both 28 per cent), confidence (25 per cent) and family (22 per cent).Sex rated 14 per cent, bullying and peer pressure both 13 per cent, suicide 11 per cent and drugs 7 per cent.“Things like self-esteem, suicide, peer pressure … are almost like taboo topics,” Ms Davis-Tana said.Youthline’s annual street appeal is this Friday, May 23.Cyber-age helpHow do young people access information about sex, drugs, alcohol, depression, stress, health, etc?• Google & other websites – 64 per cent• Talking to friends – 46 per cent• TV shows – 15 per cent • Magazines – 11 per cent• Talking to a family member – 5 per cent• Talking to their doctor – 3 per centSource: Colmar Brunton survey, 403 people aged 16-24.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11258524last_img read more

Pacquiao 2.0: the Philippines scouts hunting for boxing’s next big thing

first_img 1 year ago Boxing champ Pernell Whitaker dies; hit by car in Virginia Written By SUBSCRIBE TO US FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE “We look for the potential of the boxer whether he wins or loses in a fight,” said promoter JC Manangquil of Sanman Promotions, which has 40 fighters including 12 who have won international titles. Spotting them is more art than science, but the scouts are looking for more than just the ability to pummel opponents with their fists. Regular tournaments put plenty of contenders on display, and serve as a magnet for fighters from other areas. READ | Four Of The Top 10 Teams In Country To Play In Paradise Jam Press Trust Of India “I hope just one of two of them will (succeed),” he added. “Just one or two of them and we’re good.” One of the hotspots of boxing in the Philippines is Pacquiao’s hometown, General Santos City in the nation’s south. “It’s a bonus if the boxer looks good, too,” he quipped, saying it helps in the promotion of a match. READ | Kremlin Says Russia Remains ‘open To Cooperation’ On Doping’Many boxers failed’ A dozen fighters train under his guidance in a rough outdoor camp south of the capital Manila, spending hours a day sparring and lifting weights. Jimenez’s star, and partner in the gym, is 27-year-old Jerwin Ancajas, who is set for an IBF junior bantamweight title defence in December. The boxers are a significant investment — and gamble — as they are fed, housed and given a modest allowance.READ | Bruce Lee Birthday: Here Is How The Legend Impacted Martial ArtsYears of training expenses and no wins drained Jimenez’s savings, and by 2013 he was forced to sell his properties to stay afloat. But exercising the same determination they demand of their fighters, Jimenez and Ancajas kept going — even if they had to train in vacant lots and in the street. Then in 2016 came what they had hoped and prayed for: Ancajas’s IBF junior bantamweight belt. A defence of the title a year later netted enough cash to invest in their own gym. The enormous popularity of the sweet science in the Philippines means scores of children gravitate to gyms, but just a handful stick it out. “Out of 10 children, there will only be one or two of them who really wants to pursue boxing,” said trainer and coach Edito Villamor. First Published: 28th November, 2019 10:34 IST 10 months ago Anthony Joshua is 10th on recently release World’s Richest Boxer List! “The number one trait I look for in a boxer is the attitude,” trainer Joven Jimenez told AFP, saying his fighters need to be “determined, obedient and disciplined”. COMMENT 9 months ago Is Floyd Mayweather broke? Why is he coming out of retirement for a UFC fight? In the boxing-obsessed Philippines, scores of young fighters dream of becoming the next Manny Pacquiao, but it takes a sharp eye and vast experience to pick out a potential world champion. That expertise comes from the scouts and trainers who scour amateur matches at the dusty town “fiestas”, rely on spotters’ referrals or size up hopefuls as young as eight training in well-worn gyms. They are the lesser-known but vital cogs in the Philippines’ boxing machine, which has produced dozens of world champion fighters, many of whom were born into poverty.READ | UFC: Tony Ferguson Vs Khabib Nurmagomedov Promo Will Give You GoosebumpsIt’s a risky way to make a living — some coaches have faced ruin when the fighters they have backed, pouring money into their training and upkeep, didn’t win. But when victory comes, the pay-off can be big, or at least enough to keep going in the sport they love. The shining example is, of course, Pacquiao. Born into a poor family, he quit school at 14 and ended up on the street. Pacquiao, now also a Philippine senator, declared assets worth some $59 million in 2018. His career, including an unparalleled eight world championships in different weight divisions, is a tempting incitement to boys born into similarly bleak circumstances. While in real life they may be impoverished and ignored, in the boxing world they are a precious element to be forged into winners. 10 months ago Mayweather replies to Pacquiao’s challenge, confident of victory Once they take on a boxer, the real work of training and shaping begins. It can take years, and many fighters don’t make the grade. “People always think that what we do is very simple — one fighter gets big and famous and gets money,” he said. “But they don’t know how we reach that after many boxers who failed.”  Last Updated: 28th November, 2019 10:34 IST Pacquiao 2.0: The Philippines Scouts Hunting For Boxing’s Next Big Thing In the boxing-obsessed Philippines, scores of young fighters dream of becoming the next Manny Pacquiao, but it takes a sharp eye & vast experience to find them WE RECOMMEND “We, the coaches, are looking for boxers who would become the next Manny Pacquiao so we teach them everything, including discipline and humility,” said Anthony Ornopia, a former boxer who is now a trainer. LIVE TVlast_img read more