Albion renovated cottage has city skyline views

first_imgKick back and gaze out on the city with a glass of wine.“We love the view from the deck,” Mr Higgins said.“We like to sit back with a glass of wine, looking straight at the city.”Mr Higgins said the indoor-outdoor flow enabled easy entertaining.“We really wanted the kitchen to flow and connect with the external deck area,” he said.“The layout has been fantastic for entertaining when we have people over for things like Riverfire.” There is an in-built barbecue, sink and wine fridge on the balcony.At the rear of the second floor is an open-plan living, kitchen and dining area, which flows out to the back deck.This area has an in-built barbecue, sink and wine fridge, and is Mr Higgins’ favourite space at the property. At the rear of the home is a plunge pool.More from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019The residence includes a small part of the original cottage at the front of the property, before opening up to a large extension, both upstairs and down.There are two bedrooms on each floor, with a garage, bathroom, laundry and family room also downstairs.Upstairs is the main bedroom, and its ensuite which has a double vanity. The house at 33 Lever St, Albion, is for sale.THE ever evolving Albion has been the ideal place for Hunter and Sally Higgins to build their perfect family home.Mr Higgins said the recent boom in the suburb’s cafe culture and the upcoming train station upgrade made it an up and coming suburb.center_img The front of the house has the original cottage from the block.“Albion, I believe, is the next big growth precinct,” Mr Higgins said.“It has evolved with all the restaurants, coffee shops and microbreweries, and it’s only 4km from the city.“There’s a lot to happen in Albion in the near future.”With the added advantage of being in the prestigious Ascot State School catchment, it would be hard to beat the location of the house in the quiet Lever St. An indoor-outdoor flow was an important part of the home’s design.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:51Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:51 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p432p432p270p270pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenStarting your hunt for a dream home00:51last_img read more

Miami-Dade County Sued Over Immigration Policy

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of University of Miami The University of Miami School of Law’s Immigration Clinic has filed a federal suit against Miami-Dade County for illegally detaining a U.S. citizen under its controversial jail policy of holding people in lockup for immigration authorities.The suit, filed on behalf of an 18-year-old US citizen, asks Miami-Dade County and County Mayor Carlos Gimenez for monetary damages.The lawsuit, joined by the law firm of Kurzban, Kurzban, Weinger, Tetzeli & Pratt, P.A. and the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, challenges Miami-Dade County’s policy of detaining people beyond the end of their criminal custody solely for a suspected civil immigration violation.Adopted by Mayor Gimenez on January 26, 2017, the immigration detainer policy violates the U.S. Constitution, including the prohibition against unlawful seizures under the Fourth Amendment and the guarantee of due process under the Fourteenth Amendment, according to the filing. Florida law also prohibits jail officials from detaining people for civil immigration purposes.Garland Creedle was jailed at Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center after police arrested him after an alleged domestic dispute. Creedle paid his bond shortly after he was arrested, but county jail officials failed to release him and instead held him for immigration officials. No criminal charges were ever filed in court against Creedle.Miami-Dade County has been detaining people in jail for federal immigration enforcement officials ever since President Trump threatened in January to cut off funding for cities deemed “sanctuary cities.”Creedle was born in Honduras to a U.S. citizen father and has been a U.S. citizen since birth. Immigration authorities have been aware of Creedle’s U.S. citizenship since 2015, when they filed a motion to terminate immigration court proceedings against Creedle because he is a U.S. citizen.“The Mayor and County Commissioners failed to listen to our community’s overwhelming opposition to this immigration jail policy,” said Rebecca Sharpless, attorney for Garland Creedle and director of the Immigration Clinic at Miami Law. “Mixing our local criminal justice system with federal immigration enforcement is not only bad policy, it is illegal. We are all now paying the price.”Copyright 2017 – Caribbean National Weekly Newslast_img read more

‘Everything clouds over and goes dark’ – Iniesta on depression at Barcelona

first_imgIniesta began having sessions with psychologist Inma Puig, who said the Spaniard’s recovery owed much to those around him, including Guardiola.“Guardiola said this is the first time I’ve been in this situation as a coach,” said Puig. “I remember he said, ‘the most important thing now is Andres, the person not the player’.”“They’re people and this is a very human thing which affects millions of people around the world,” said Guardiola. “They have to know we are there for them.”“Guardiola tried to get him out of that bottomless pit he was in,” said Iniesta’s mother Maria.Iniesta came through Barcelona’s La Masia academy and went on to win nine La Liga titles and four Champions Leagues with the club.He also lifted the World Cup with Spain in 2010, after scoring the winning goal against the Netherlands in the final.Despite receiving a hero’s farewell from Barca, Iniesta hinted his relationship with the board influenced his decision to go to Japan.“People at the club never imagined I could leave,” Iniesta said. “It’s like everything, in relationships if you don’t discuss things at the right time there comes a time when there’s no way back.”Share on: WhatsApp Iniesta left Barcelona in 2018 after winning nine La Liga and four Champions League titles with the clubMadrid, Spain | AFP | Andres Iniesta has described his struggle with depression while playing for Barcelona, which his mother says was a “bottomless pit” that caused her 25-year-old son to ask to sleep with his parents.Iniesta recalls his experience with the illness in a Rakuten TV documentary, ‘Andres Iniesta – The Unexpected Hero’, which was released on Thursday and covers his move to Japanese side Vissel Kobe in 2018.After winning the Champions League under Pep Guardiola in 2009, Iniesta was battling injury and then hit by the death of his friend Dani Jarque, the 26-year-old Espanyol defender who suffered a heart attack.“The days pass and you realise you’re not improving, you don’t feel good, you’re not yourself. Everything clouds over and goes dark,” Iniesta said.On Jarque’s death, Iniesta added: “That was like a body blow, something powerful that knocked me down again and I was pretty low, clearly because I wasn’t very well.”Iniesta’s depression is described by those closest to him, including his mother Maria Lujan and father Jose Antonio.“I noticed he wasn’t well one night when we were sleeping downstairs and he came down and said, ‘mum can I sleep here with you?’” Maria said. “Then the world came down on my head.”Jose Antonio said: “Our 25 year-old son coming down at midnight and wanting to sleep with his parents means he can’t be well. He said, ‘I’m not well dad’. I said, ‘what’s wrong?’ ‘I don’t know, I don’t feel well.’”Iniesta’s father admitted he thought his son might have to take a break from football. “At one stage I thought he would have to stop because the most important thing was him,” said Jose Antonio.last_img read more

Armed security escort teams following investigation

first_imgPITTSBURGH (AP) — Armed police officers have been escorting a western Pennsylvania high school’s sports teams to games at another school following allegations that its own soccer team used racial slurs during a game last month. School police officers traveled with Connellsville Area High School athletic teams to away games at Penn Hills High School this week.The Western Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic League investigated after Penn Hills officials said Connellsville soccer players used slurs during a Sept. 6 game.Officials concluded that allegations made by Penn Hills officials were “reasonably credible,” but they were not certain to have occurred.Penn Hills Superintendent Nancy Hines said Connellsville’s decision to bring armed security was “culturally insensitive” and asked league officials to discourage the other school from doing it.She wrote in a letter to district employees that Connellsville brought the guards to games at least three times in the past week, but never before.She said they positioned themselves near the Connellsville teams’ benches and escorted players to the bathrooms and locker rooms.Spectators were not allowed at a boys’ soccer game Monday.Connellsville Area School District Superintendent Joseph Bradley described the practice of bringing school officers to “appropriate away events” as standard practice. He said school police officers attend all home games, all playoff games and other games that involve rivalries or large crowds.Connellsville is a predominantly white school; Penn Hills has a high percentage of black students.The league has directed Connellsville Area School District student athletes to participate in racial and cultural sensitivity training.Following reports that Connellsville students, fans and players used racial slurs during the Sept. 6 soccer game, Penn Hills officials halted all games with Connellsville and sought a league investigation.The league concluded late last month that although it was not certain that slurs were used by players, the Penn Hills’ players were credible. The league determined that it was “likely that at least some racial slurs or racially insensitive comments were directed to a Penn Hills player or players.”After the investigation, Penn Hills announced it would resume playing teams from Connellsville. (Courier File Photo)last_img read more

Former NFL Pro Bowl Players try curling with Olympic goal

first_imgIn this Jan. 3, 2019 photo, former Minnesota Vikings football player Jared Allen practices with his curling team for a competition in Blaine, Minn.  (AP Photo/Jim Mone) “Honestly, they were a little better than I had expected,” said Matt Hamilton, the second on that team. “All in all, Jared was technically pretty sound. But at the end of the day, I’ve seen thousands of curling shots and situations and that is ultimately going to win us more games.”Although curling matches are often conceded when they are out of reach, the Olympians kept playing through the eighth (of 10) ends, to help the football players gain the experience they will need if they are going to be more competitive. (If it’s any consolation for Allen’s crew, Shuster’s rink also scored a five-ender against Sweden in the gold medal match.)“We had one bad end, and we just kept playing with them. We just wanted to be a sponge,” Bulger said. “The key was they knew we were taking it seriously. It wasn’t just us saying ‘We’re going to take over curling,’ kind of as a gimmick.“We hope to play them again,” he said, “when we’re better.”The All-Pros are back at it at the USA Men’s Challenge Round in Blaine, Minnesota, this weekend, where they are competing for one of four remaining spots in next month’s national championships. (Top teams like Shuster’s have already qualified.)They got off to a rough start in their first match, falling 10-1 to Steve Birklid’s Seattle-based rink on Thursday night. But, by hopping into the sport early in the Olympic cycle, they have almost three more years before the team for the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing is chosen.Hamilton confessed that he was put off at first about newcomers thinking they could go to the Olympics after four years in a sport he has worked at his entire life to master. But he also realized that the publicity will be good for curling, which has struggled to break out of its niche as an every four years curiosity.“If I really think I’m that good, I should be like ‘Bring it on!’” Hamilton said in an email to The Associated Press from a competition in Japan. “How much they respected the game, though, is what made me realize they aren’t making a mockery. We just have some extremely athletic individuals who respect sport but have a need to compete in their blood. Can’t disrespect that!”All four football players agreed that the reception they’ve received from lifetime curlers has been decidedly different than the one that might welcome a curler who tried to break into the hyper-competitive NFL.“Oh, he’d get smashed,” Allen said. “We’d go out of our way to test his mettle, for sure.”Instead, the ex-NFLers found that the tight-knit but friendly community of curlers was eager to accept them. In their match against the Olympians, there was trash-talking — or banter, depending on whom you ask — and Hamilton even gave them some of his old curling gear.“I looked at their broom heads and I was disgusted. I was wondering why these former pro football players couldn’t afford new broom heads,” he said. “So I went into my curling bag and gave them some gently used ones before the game. That really surprised Jared, claiming nothing like that would ever fly in football.”Like many of those who only experience curling every four years, on TV, the football players saw the sweeping and the shouting and underestimated how hard it is. “We played football, but it’s a lot of muscles we didn’t use,” Bulger said.Sliding on the ice was also an adjustment, but the biggest challenge has been the strategy.When he first started watching, Bulger said, he would see curlers setting up protective stones called guards and thought they were missing their shots.“We just assumed that you throw to the button every time, and we learned that is not the game,” he said. “It’s like a novice chess player going against” a grandmaster.But their NFL experience did help in other ways, priming them with not just physical fitness but also good practice habits, the ability to make decisions on the fly and to improve through film study and coaching.“Like any other sport you have to learn, try to figure out how to get better,” Bulluck said. “Playing football at a very high level, being one of the best at the position once upon a time, to get to that level in anything you do you have to be able to take coaching.”And, of course, they’re competitive.“The message is: We want to bring attention to it. We want to have fun with it,” Allen said. “But we’re dead serious about what we’re trying to accomplish.”___More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Defensive lineman Jared Allen retired from the NFL in 2015 and wasn’t ready to give up on the competition he’d come to enjoy as a five-time All-Pro.center_img His solution: The Olympics.The problem: He didn’t compete in any Olympic sports.Less than a year later, Allen and three other former NFL stars — none with any prior experience — are attempting to qualify for the U.S. national curling championships against players who have been throwing stones for most of their lives.It would be the first step toward competing in the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing.“Every team in the NFL — whether you’re hot garbage or the defending Super Bowl champions — every coach come August says the same thing: ‘We’re trying to win the Super Bowl,’” Allen said. “We come from that mentality, where we set lofty goals.“Our short term goals are continually to get better: fundamentals, strategy, sweeping. We know if we master these little things, it will take us a long way.”A 12-year NFL veteran who spent most of his career with the Chiefs and Vikings, Allen was lamenting the end of his playing days when a friend dared him to try to try an Olympic sport. Allen toyed with the idea of badminton but rejected it as too taxing.“We thought about curling: It was chill, and the winners have to buy the losers beer,” he said. “We thought it was a win-win.”In this Jan. 3, 2019 photo, former Minnesota Vikings football player Jared Allen, second from left, stands with his three curling teammates, from left, Michael Roos, Keith Bullock and Marc Bulger after practice for a competition in Blaine, Minn.  (AP Photo/Jim Mone)He rounded up former Rams quarterback Marc Bulger and Titans linebacker Keith Bulluck and tackle Michael Roos to form a team; all were Pro Bowl selections during their NFL career, and living in the Nashville, Tennessee, area.Adopting the name All-Pro Curling Team, they started from scratch in March and kept their plans under wraps until they felt like they had made enough progress.“We wanted the reaction when we got on the ice to be ’Oh, how long have you guys been doing this?” Allen said in a telephone interview after practicing on a converted hockey rink in Nashville. “We were serious. We didn’t want it to seem like it was just some media hype, or just trying to stay relevant.”The first test was in November, when Allen and Bulger — with two “regular” curlers — competed in the Curl Mesabi Classic in Northern Minnesota. Their first opponent: The gold medal-winning team from Pyeongchang led by four-time Olympian John Shuster.They lost 11-3, giving up five points in the sixth end.last_img read more

Watch: Red Star Belgrade stars celebrate CL qualification by riding in a tank through…

first_imgAdvertisement Serbian side Red Star Belgrade’s fans have welcomed a real battle tank which was used during the bloody war of Yugoslavia in the 90s at their home-ground. The club unveiled the decommissioned Soviet-made T-55 Yugoslav army tank on the eve of their Champions League playoffs against Swiss side Young Boys on Tuesday. The club website says that the tank symbolizes their slogan “Machine Has Started.” and the vehicle was parked near the northern stand at the stadium near which is reserved for the club’s ultras, called Delije, or roughly translated the tough boys.Advertisement While the fans refer to themselves as the Northern Army, have often used a tank symbol to show their support for their club during home games, but this daring stunt has triggered a strong reaction from neighbouring Croatia, which fought a war for independence from the Serb-led Yugoslavia. The Croatian media said the tank is “a clear provocation”, “a scandal,” and suggested that the European governing body of football, UEFA, must react. Various liberal Serbian organisations have called on authorities to remove the army vehicle and condemned the display as “glorification of war symbols.”Advertisement Watch the Red Star fans celebrate their victory over Young Boys riding the tank:Typically discreet celebration from the Red Star Belgrade players as they toasted qualification to the Champions League last night by riding through the streets on a tank. pic.twitter.com/4hCEOtZbC8Advertisement — MUNDIAL (@MundialMag) August 28, 2019The armored vehicle which has been painted in red and white the official color of the club, was purchased from a military waste site, club officials confirmed. But this could prove to be a “stupid decision” and could lead to serious UEFA punishments, some reports claim.The tank was put out in public, just a week after some masked assailants attacked two bars in Croatia as few ethnic Serbs in that country were watching Red Star’s first leg-match against Young Boys on television. The horrific incident which left at least five people injured and damages to the bar, has also triggered heated discussions among Croatian and Serbian politicians.[Video by TW/@MundialMag] Advertisementlast_img read more

Holiday Events for Dec. 14-20

first_imgATLANTIC HIGHLANDSThe Atlantic Highlands Historical Society will host a holiday performance at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19, by the Henry Hudson High School A Cappella Choir, directed by Cody Holody.Attendees will be able to enjoy holiday songs and refreshments in the decorated Strauss Mansion, 27 Prospect Circle. The mansion will be open at 7 p.m. * * * * *Claddagh na nGael is hosting a Christmas social/fundraiser to benefit Sandy victims from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec 16, at Molly Maguire’s Blackpoint Inn, 132 East River Road.The event will be an afternoon of Irish music and family entertainment. With as many as 20 musicians expected, children and student musicians are welcome to the open session. New unwrapped toys will be collected for distribution to children whose families were hit hard by Super Storm Sandy. The toys will be donated to Project Paul, which operates the largest food pantry in Monmouth County helping approximately 1,600 individuals a week.Donations for the organization will also be accepted. Checks should be made payable to Project Paul.Those who can’t afford a toy or monetary donation are invite to bring their families and listen to the good music.Information about Project Paul is available at www.projpaul.org. MIDDLETOWNCentrex Sports Club is offering holiday cheer for those less fortunate and for those families who were affected by Sandy, with a free brunch and other holiday activities from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, Dec. 15. Santa Claus will arrive by fire truck from Middletown Volunteer Fire Company 1 and will pose for photos with the children.State Senator Joseph M. Kyrillos Jr. and his family will be joined by township elected officials as they and club representatives distribute toys from the club’s annual drive.Centrex is located at 500 State Highway 35 in the Union Square shopping center. COLTS NECKColts Neck High School is hosting the Jingle Bell Walk, a 5K Stroll for Sandy at 10 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, to help raise money for disaster relief efforts.The 5K walk will start and end near the track where vendors and crowds will gather. Jersey Strong T-shirts and food and drinks will be available.After the walk, music and entertainment will be provided.Prizes will be awarded at 11 a.m. for best holiday-themed costume for a group and individual.Walkers are encouraged to bring food for The FoodBank of Monmouth and Ocean Counties and unwrapped presents for Toys for Tots.The preregistration fee is $20 and race day registration is $25. Children 10 and under walk for free.Corporate donations and sponsorships are being sought.All proceeds will be donated to the schools in Monmouth County as well as the township’s adopted town of Union Beach. LITTLE SILVERRed Bank Regional (RBR) has the recipe to usher in the holiday season with fabulous music, dance and art.The RBR Academy of Visual & Performing Arts (VPA) will present a Holiday Showcase, at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14-15, at the RBR Theatre at 101 Ridge Road in Little Silver.The presentations are unique and feature different works each night. The performing groups include the RBR art, drama, creative writing, instrumental music, piano, photography and vocal majors with the chamber singers, concert choir, concert bank, harp ensemble and string ensemble.Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for students and senior citizens. RUMSONThe English Speaking Union will be holding its annual holiday repast on Saturday, Dec. 15, at the Rumson Country Club, 163 Rumson Road.Libations will be served at 6 p.m., followed by a 7 p.m. traditional English Christmas dinner and entertainment at 8 p.m.The organization’s scholarship winner, Evelyn Giovine, will provide a special holiday program.The cost is $60 per person for members and $65 for nonmembers. Wine will be provided at the table, and a cash bar will be available throughout the evening.All are welcome; the dress is black tie optional.A silent auction, with half of the proceeds to be donated to local storm relief efforts, will be featured.Additional information is available by contacting ESU President Richard Biernacki at 732-787-2217 or emailing esupresident@ comcast.net. * * * * *The festivities continue all month throughout town.Every Saturday through Dec. 22 from noon to 3 p.m. shoppers can enjoy the sounds of the season from the Holiday Harmonies. Tradi­tional carolers, choirs, brass bands, rock, folk, jazz and blues musicians will bring holiday tunes to the sidewalks of Red Bank.Classic horse and carriage rides will be available from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturdays through Dec. 22, sponsored by Pauline Poyner and Red Bank RiverCenter.A new event – “We Double Dog Dare You Scavenger Hunt” – will allow participants to visit the 50-plus businesses involved to search through Sunday, Dec. 16, for a hidden holiday character inspired by the holiday classic movie A Christmas Story. Shoppers will gather stamps on their hunt for every character they find, and once 15 are collected, they can be entered to win a Red Bank prize package.The movie theme continues with the return of the popular, window-decorating contest. Businesses have been invited to decorate their windows using any holiday movie they choose. Shoppers can vote online at www.ACoolLittle Town.com through Sunday, Dec. 16, for their favorite windows.Pictures with Santa will be available from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, and Sunday, Dec. 16 by, TSS Photography at The Galleria, 2 Bridge Ave.Free parking continues in borough parking lots through Christmas Day, courtesy of the Borough of Red Bank.In a program that captures the heart of the Christmas story, the 50-voice Tower Hill Choir presents “A Spiritual Christmas,” at 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, in the sanctuary of the First Presbyterian Church at Red Bank (Tower Hill), 255 Harding Road.The choir is under the direction of Adam Peithmann, the church’s director of music ministries. RED BANKA Christmas Carol will be presented at the Count Basie Theatre at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15. The play is a production of the Nebraska Theatre Caravan’s national tour. A cast of two-dozen actors with a live orchestra will faithfully portray all the beloved characters from Dickens’ 1843 novel.Their voices and lively dancing render traditional carols like “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen,” “Away In a Manager” and “Here We Come A-Wassailing” as a musical theater treat for the entire family.This production recreates Victorian era London with more than 100 costumes, a set evoking a Currier and Ives print and ghostly special effects.Tickets are $49.50, $29.50 and $19.50 and are available at the theater box office at 99 Monmouth St. or by calling 732-842-9000. * * * * *The adult and children’s choirs of St. Agnes Catholic Church will present their 18th annual Christmas Concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16.The choirs will be directed by G. Thomas Elliott and accompanied by organist Corina Pauta.The church is located at 103 Center Ave., at the corner of Avenue C. FAIR HAVENThe Fair Haven PTA’s biennial house hour will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 14, and will include a Super Storm Sandy relief fundraising effort designed to assist local victims with replacing kitchen and household items lost in the storm.Tour attendees will be encouraged to donate new kitchen essentials and much needed gift cards for home-goods stores. There will be donation boxes at each of the eight tour homes. These donations will be given to Sandy Family Match to distribute to local victims of Sandy.Tickets to Fair Haven’s First Floors are $50 and will be sold, beginning at 10:30 a.m. the day of the tour, at 248 Kemp Ave. and 85 Grange Ave. No children will be allowed on the tour and participants will be asked to remove their shoes. The Two River area has an array of concerts, shows, bazaars and other fun events for the holiday season. Here is a selection of events in the area this week:last_img read more

AFCON 2021 Qualifiers: Aristide Bance in as Burkina Faso names strong squad to face Uganda Cranes

first_imgBance is one of the big names in Burkina Faso’s squad. (PHOTO/Courtesy).AFCON 2021 QualifierBurkina Faso vs UgandaStade du 4 Aout, OuagadougouWednesday, 13-11-2019 @10pmBurkina Faso have revealed their squad set to take on Uganda Cranes on Wednesday night.The Swallows will host Uganda at the Stade du 4 Aout in their opening fixture of the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations (AFCON) qualifiers.The team will also be the one that travels away to South Sudan in their next game on Sunday.The likes of Lyon’s Bertrand Traore, Jonathan Pitroipa and Aristide Bance have all been included.Captain Charles Kabore is also part of the fold as Burkina Faso eyes a return to the African show piece having missed out in the last edition in Egypt.Surprisingly, all three goalkeepers summoned on the team are local based.Farid Steeve of Majestic Football Club, Ben Idriss Traore (AS Sonabel) and Aboubacar Sawadogo (As Douanes) are the custodians that have been named.Burkina Faso SquadGoalkeepersFarid Steeve (Majestic, Burkina Faso) Ben Idriss Traore (AS Sonabel, Burkina Faso), Aboubacar Sawadogo (As Douanes, Burkina Faso)DefendersIssoufou Dayo (RS Berkane, Morocco), Edmond Fayçal Tapsoba (Guimaraes, Portugal), Dylan Ouédraogo (OH Louvain, Belgium), Abas Ouedraogo (Salitas), Soumaïla Ouattara (Rahimo FC), Steeve Yago (Caen, France), Yacouba Coulibaly (Le Havre, France), Issa Kaboré (Mechelen, Belgium)MidfieldersAdama Guira (Guangzhou R & F, China), Charles Kaboré (Dynamo Moscow, Russia), Bryan Dabo (Fiorentina, Italy), Bertrand Traoré (Lyon, France), Cyrille Bayala (AC Ajaccio, France), Dramane Nikiema (Horoya AC , Guinea), Alain Traore (RS Berkane, Morocco), Zakaria Sanogo (FC Ararat, Armenia)ForwardsLassina Traoré (Ajax Amsterdam, Holland), Aristide Bancé (Horoya AC, Guinea), Jonathan Pitroipa (Paris FC, France), Eric Traore (Pyramid, Egypt)Comments Tags: AFCON 2021 QualifiersAristed BanceBurkina FasoUganda Craneslast_img read more

Happy New Biomimetics Year

first_img(Visited 23 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The variety of design applications coming from the imitation of natural solutions continues to be astonishing.Hope for sensitive teeth:  When is it time to see the dentist?  At 2:30 (tooth hurty).  If you have sensitive teeth like 3 out of 4 people, there may be a biomimetic solution coming.  Sensitivity occurs when dentin at the gum line erodes, leaving nerves exposed to hot, cold, sweet or sour signals.  PhysOrg and Science Daily, echoing a press release from the American Chemical Society, announced a way to rebuild enamel and dentin, taking a clue from mussels.  Mussels build a waterproof adhesive to secure themselves to the rocks.  “Taking inspiration from nature,” a team “reasoned that it could help keep minerals in contact with dentin long enough for the rebuilding process to occur.”  They have invented a “gooey substance” that allows the dentin and enamel to grow together (see picture on PhysOrg).  This solution would be far better than the current band-aid treatment of brushing with special toothpaste that deadens the nerves.  Instead, the adhesive could allow the teeth to be reconstructed for good.Pearl of great price:  The beauty of pearl and mother-of-pearl (nacre) goes beyond its attractiveness in jewelry.  The material is also desirable for its durability against cracks.  Biomimetics engineers would like to imitate the construction of similar materials, but understanding how the mollusk does it is a prerequisite.  It looks like imitation will be a way off; in a PNAS paper, researchers described how they”identified 80 shell matrix proteins, among which 66 are entirely unique.”  Although they believed that shell-making was key to the “evolutionary success” of mollusks, they didn’t describe how these unique proteins arose, each one being a highly improbable outcome for a blind evolutionary process (see online book).  The French team said,This is the only description of the whole “biomineralization toolkit” of the matrices that, at least in part, is thought to regulate the formation of the prismatic and nacreous shell layers in the pearl oysters. We unambiguously demonstrate that prisms and nacre are assembled from very different protein repertoires. This suggests that these layers do not derive from each other.Imitating rapid steroid synthesis:  Researchers at Scripps Institute are achieving “a feat … that only nature could make on a large scale” – the synthesis of polyhydroxylated steroids.  “”These compounds. used in heart-failure medications and other drugs, have been notoriously problematic to synthesize in the laboratory,” PhysOrg reported.  The work “points the way to a scalable formation and modification of a variety of useful compounds that had been obtainable in significant quantities only from plants or animals.”  They reduced the number of steps from 41 to 21, making nature’s feat still look superior.Bioinspired catalysts:  Nature makes it look so easy.  “Naturally occurring metalloenzymes have long been recognized as attractive catalysts for aerobic oxidations because they can operate under mild conditions with complete chemoselectivity,” Science Magazine said. “Simulation of the function of these enzymes has led to the discovery of many biomimetic oxidation catalysts.”  Martine Largeron and Maurice-Bernard Fleury described progress in this dynamic research field.  Researchers aren’t yet close to catching up with what living cells do every day:Many challenges remain, including the development of biomimetic catalytic systems that operate effectively at room temperature with ambient air rather than pure molecular oxygen. The development of recyclable heterogeneous nanocluster catalysts that contain biocompatible rather than rare and precious metals would also be welcome. From a more general viewpoint, mimicking the function of amine oxidase enzymes would provide environmentally friendly organic synthesis because air is the cheaper and less polluting stoichiometric oxidant.Mitochondria-inspired fuel cells:  Inspired by how cellular organelles like mitochondria and chloroplasts harvest sunlight so efficiently, researchers at the University of Reading have built nanowire networks with vastly increased surface area that can reside on plastic substrates, promising fuel cells and other products that are more efficient, cheaper, lightweight, and environmentally friendly.  PhysOrg headlined this, “Nanomaterial inspired by nature paves way for greener energy.”  If you don’t mind the goofy music, a video clip shows the manufacturing process.Living buildings:  Imagine buildings of the future hosting lichens and mosses that can absorb excess C02.  That’s becoming an option, reported Science Daily, with a drawing of a building with a “vegetated facade” making the most of the sunlight.  The new material, designed at a university in Barcelona, Spain, “offers environmental, thermal and aesthetic advantages over other similar construction solutions.”  It also improves the thermal comfort of people inside.  “The innovative feature of this new (vertical multilayer) concrete is that it acts as a natural biological support for the growth and development of certain biological organisms, to be specific, certain families of microalgae, fungi, lichens and mosses.”  The layered structure captures rainwater for use by the organisms, and as they grow, the buildings will change in color over time.  The researchers see their patented concrete being used for renovating buildings, creating “vertical gardens” and designing architectures that blend into the landscape.Everyone can love biomimetics.  Many of the above are unique stories, not mentioned here before.  Faster, better, cheaper – nature shows us the way.  Darwin-talk drops out of the discussion when the focus is on natural design we can use to improve our lives.last_img read more

Adrenaline rush: Greg Minnaar

first_img15 January 2003Sitting down to lunch with Greg Minnaar, I am struck by the sparkle in his eyes. From that light within it is easy to deduce that he is a young man who enjoys his life – and especially outdoor sports. He is tanned and relaxed, and the 2003 mountain bike downhill world champion is good and interesting company.Greg’s initial sporting interest was in motocross, but that meant his parents, who owned a bicycle shop, needed to take him to the motocross track and sit with him while he practised. Because of the constraints of work, Greg was unable to practice motocross as often as he would have liked.What he could do, however, was to take his mountain bike out into the forests around World’s View, just north of Pietermaritzburg, and enjoy the adrenaline thrill of flying downhill at speed. So it was that downhill mountain biking became his first choice in sport.Truly a relaxed individual, Greg Minnaar’s exterior hides the fact that he whatever he chooses to do, he wants to do well – not just compete, but challenge for wins. That showed early when he demonstrated excellent downhill racing ability from a young age.World Cup at 16In 1997, Minnaar was given the opportunity to attend the World Cup in Switzerland, even though he was just 16 years of age. Incredibly, he managed to qualify twelfth. Unfortunately, in the race proper, Greg took a fall. Despite that setback he still managed to secure 51st place – a decent performance if one takes his tumble into account and, of course, the standard of the competition.More important than his placing, though, was the impact that being at the World Cup had on Greg. Being around his heroes, those stars he had previously seen in magazines only, convinced him that this was what he wanted to do, what he wanted to be: a professional mountain bike downhill racer.Convincing his parents was, naturally, tough because he wanted to become a professional there and then. And he hadn’t yet finished school. They said no to his pleas.Fortunately for Greg, he found an unlikely ally. The headmaster of Alexander High School was asked for his thoughts on Greg’s aim to turn professional immediately. Go for it, he said, Greg could always complete his schooling at a later stage if he chose to do so. And so Greg Minnaar left school early to become a professional downhill racer!He managed a 28th-place finish when the World Cup came to Stellenbosch in South Africa but, admits Greg, “it was a home course and I had the advantage of knowing it”. His next outings saw him place “nowhere”. He persevered.Questioned his decisionMinnaar admits that during his first year overseas he questioned his decision to turn professional and race so far away from home. He missed his family and friends, and found the going tough. Nonetheless, the results started to come, and he settled down to the grind of travel and being part of a big team where discipline was strictly enforced.“I don’t mind discipline”, says Minnaar, “but I found it tough being told the same thing 20 times”.In 2001 he tasted victory for the first time, winning in Kaprun, Austria. This was both a good and a bad thing; bitten by the victory bug, Minnaar wanted more. “I pushed too hard the next year, in 2002”, he admits, “and because of that I came short. My strength is my consistency.”Luckily, Minnaar learnt his lesson and adapted his racing to his strengths. In 2003 his consistency came through. Though he won only one race, he finished in the top five often – often enough that, when the points were finally tallied, he was the world champion.Remarkable yearMaking it an even more remarkable year is that Minnaar also won in North America, capturing the Norba title with much the same approach: consistency over a “go for broke” mentality.He told me about the two competitions, explaining that the World Championships require more technical skills, while the Norba racing tends to be less demanding technically. Because of the difference, it’s quite a challenge.Minnaar was also honoured at home when he was named the South African Mountain Bike Cyclist of the Year for 2003. No surprise there .I asked him about 2001, when he won his first World Cup event but was overlooked in the cyclist of the year balloting, with Robbie Hunter being honoured. Sure, Hunter was on a top professional road team, but Greg had won a world title.He admits he was angry, and says it still seems that road cyclists are given greater respect than mountain bikers. There are many who would agree with him.When one considers how close racing is at the top, where every tenth of a second is vital, it comes as quite a surprise to me that Greg describes his approach as “conservative”.Frankly, though, what he considers conservative would likely strike Joe Public as suicidal. He might think he’’ conservative, but the crowds of 20 000 to 40 000 that watch the mountain bike downhill racing all around the world would disagree. Why else would they be drawn to the racing? It is fast, furious and exciting.New teamGreg’s world title came when he was riding for the Haro/Lee Dungarees team, and he definitely made a good impression on the team. However, he was approached by a number of other teams after his successful season, and after consulting the Haro/Lee Dunagrees team an amiable split was agreed upon so that he could join the Team G Cross Honda.He admits that in the short term he could have made more money staying with the Haro team, but with Honda – although a formal contract stating as such has not yet been signed – Greg reckons he stands to make more financially over time. He says he could spend 10 years with the team, and what is really exciting is that they want him to be the face of the team, which is new for 2004.Make no mistake, Honda is a big name that is recognised the world over. And, as Greg explained to me, they do things thoroughly, their approach being that your equipment is either 100% ready for racing or you don’t race at all.“Pretty exciting”“Yeah, it’s pretty exciting”, he says of the testing that Honda is doing on his bike for 2004. For the first time in his career his team will be building a bike with only one person in mind: Greg Minnaar.Chatting to Minnaar, it is clear that he loves what he does. “If you like something you’ll do well in it”, he says. Also clear is that he has real fun in his career. He enjoys the adrenaline thrill. “I get bored cycling on the road”, he says.In fact, just before he joined me for lunch, he had been out learning how to do a backward somersault on his motocross bike, and I could see the sense of achievement he felt after getting it right on just his third attempt! He was on his way back there afterwards to mess around some more.Amazingly, Minnaar believes that until 2003 he hadn’t yet applied himself fully to his sport. Now, with a new team that is most definitely focused on rocketing to the top, and the knowledge of what his whole-hearted effort can achieve – a world championship – Minnaar is hoping for a 2004 season that is as successful as 2003.My personal thoughts: he’s a humble, nice guy and I hope he reaches those heights again. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more