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Another Bullet stuns them

first_img The three-year-old gelding went into chase of speedy WESTERN WARRIOR from three furlongs out and outbattled him in the stretch run to win in 2:09.3 with stable jockey Omar Walker astride. ANOTHER BULLET was among a stinging trio of outsiders to rock punters at the back end of the 10-race card. TAZ, running for the second time, made all from postposition one at five furlongs straight in the eighth race, winning at odds of 16-1 with Oneil Mullings. After ANOTHER BULLET’s shocker in the ninth, ABOGADO stormed past 14-1 shot KACI a furlong out to win the 10th at 16-1 with apprentice Javaniel Patterson. The two-kilo claiming apprentice had a second winner, COLORS OF WAR in the sixth, joining Shane Ellis as the day’s leading riders. Ellis opened the programme with CONNOR and returned to make all aboard Richard Azan’s debutante, SWEET PEPPA, in the fourth, a maiden event for three-year-old fillies. Racing continues at Caymanas Park on Saturday. TRAINER Patrick Lynch’s ANOTHER BULLET yesterday scored a stunning 11-1 upset at Caymanas Park, convincingly beating eight open-allowance rivals at 1100 metres, including 2015 Sprint champion POKER STAR. Coming into the event on the back of two strong performances, both at a mile, the last being a stubborn defeat against 2000 Guineas winner FEARLESS SAMURAI on April 29, inform ANOTHER BULLET was overlooked at the shorter distance. However, the sprinter-stayer showed his rivals no respect, swooping down four wide on the battling trio of TALENTED TONY K, KING D and POLLY B at the top of the lane. Running super light at 49.0 kilos with two-kilo claiming apprentice Odeen Edwards, ANOTHER BULLET powered off the turn and kicked in his mid-race pace, leaving the short-speed sprinters running for second. The race was not without incident as a lengthy stewards’ enquiry resulted in the disqualification of third-past-the-post CRUCIAL APPEAL, who had broadsided 1-4 favourite POKER STAR shortly after leaving the gate. POKER STAR, who finished fourth, was promoted to third behind CHACE THE GREAT, who passed the post second, but was lucky to escape disqualification after crossing stablemate CRUCIAL APPEAL in mid-track near the end of the race. Though POKER STAR had a rough reintroduction, it wasn’t all doom and gloom for trainer Wayne DaCosta, who watched RADICAL score a fighting victory over WESTERN WARRIOR at 10 furlongs in the I’msatisfied Trophy. STRETCH RUNlast_img read more

TOURISM HOPES AFTER GERMAN GOLF PROFESSIONALS VISIT DONEGAL

first_imgGERMAN golfers could be coming to Co Donegal in their droves next year, if tourism bosses get their way.Failte Ireland and Tourism Ireland Golf in Germany in cooperation with leading German golf tour operator golf.extra brought six German golf professionals to the Northwest this week.They played Ballyliffin and were absolutely blown away by the quality of the two courses. Golf professionals in Germany travel a lot with their students throughout the year to various destinations and generate a lot of business.Martina Bromley, Fáilte Ireland’s Head of Operations in the North West welcomed the group to the North West: “We believe that our golf product is among the best in the world and recent studies have shown the great potential of golf for tourism as estimating that the typical overseas golf tourist is worth almost three times the value of the average tourist to Ireland and, with approximately 155,000 overseas visitors playing golf while in Ireland, this amounts to a total estimated spend of €204 million per annum.“It is important that we fully promote what is available by assisting these groups in showcasing what Ireland has to offer.  This will certainly encourage and help maintain Ireland’s reputation as a destination for high quality and challenging golf.”In the picture from left to right is part of the group on Glashedy Links  – Erik Moll, Sven Stier, Men’s Captain Paddy Logue and Fred Hoffmann.The group also played Murvagh, Bundoran, Rosses Point and Castle Dargan to get a short overview of what the Northwest has to offer.  Advertisement TOURISM HOPES AFTER GERMAN GOLF PROFESSIONALS VISIT DONEGAL was last modified: October 27th, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:TOURISM HOPES AFTER GERMAN GOLF PROFESSIONALS VISIT DONEGALlast_img read more

Personalized cancer vaccines may fight tumors

first_imgCancer treatments that harness the body’s immune system to wipe out tumors have begun paying off for some patients for whom all other therapies have failed. Now, a small clinical study has found support for a newcomer on the cancer immunotherapy front. Injected with a vaccine designed to match specific mutations in their tumors, three patients with advanced melanoma had a strong immune response and in two their tumors shrunk or stabilized, at least temporarily. Although the study was mainly meant to test safety, the results suggest it holds promise for stopping tumors from growing.“There’s a lot of excitement about this approach,” says oncologist and cancer immunologist Craig Slingluff of the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, who was not involved with the study.Vaccines for infectious diseases typically deliver into the body bits of protein or other material from a virus or bacterium that trigger the immune system to defend against the invading pathogen. With cancer, the similar idea is to vaccinate a patient with immune-stimulating molecules, known as antigens, found only on tumor cells, so that the person’s immune system ends up attacking the tumor. But cancer vaccines have a poor record of success. That’s because most of the tumor antigens tested also appear in small amounts on healthy cells, and the immune system has mechanisms that make it tolerate, or ignore, these familiar antigens.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Scientists have their eye on a more promising kind of tumor antigen: those that result from the mutations that riddle a tumor’s DNA, thanks to the chaos cancer causes to a genome. Some of these mutations do not appear in genes that drive cancer growth, but instead code for novel peptides—short proteins—that may act as antigens on the surface of tumor cells. Because these so-called neoantigens are completely foreign to the body, they could in theory make a cancer vaccine.Devising a neoantigen cancer vaccine requires sequencing a lot of tumor DNA, which wasn’t feasible or affordable until recently. But now that DNA sequencing costs have dropped and speeds increased, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have begun exploring neoantigen cancer vaccines for melanoma, a tumor in which the sun’s ultraviolet light that sparks cancer-causing mutations also creates hundreds of additional mutations that are likely to include many coding for neoantigens.Human immunologist Beatriz Carreno, trial leader Gerald Linette, and collaborators recently studied three melanoma patients who had surgery to remove their tumors, but who had cancer cells that had spread to their lymph nodes, making tumors likely to recur. The researchers sequenced the exome, or protein-coding DNA, of each patient’s original melanoma tumor and compared it with the exome of their other cells to identify dozens of mutations coding for newly created peptides that might act as neoantigens. (Not all peptides made by a cell get displayed on its surface.) They analyzed the possible neoantigens’ structures and did lab tests to predict which are actually made by the cell and get displayed on its surface, then homed in on those most likely to trigger an immune response. For each melanoma patient they chose seven neoantigens unique to that person’s tumor.After taking blood from each patient and harvesting from it immune sentinels called dendritic cells, the researchers then mixed each patient’s set of neoantigens with these white blood cells so that they would display the peptides to other immune cells. The team used the neoantigen-coated dendritic cells to make personalized neoantigen vaccines that were infused into the patients three times over about 4 months.Carreno and collaborators found that a key measure of vaccine response, the number of immune system T cells specific to the neoantigens in each patient, rose in the patients’ blood, along with an increase in the diversity of these T cells. These neoantigen-specific T cells could also kill cultured melanoma cells expressing the same neoantigens, the team reports online today in Science.In one patient, metastatic tumors in the woman’s lungs shrank, then regrew, but are now stable after 8 months; the second person’s tumor remnants have also been stable for 9 months. A third patient who had received an immunotherapy drug after surgery that put his cancer in remission remains cancer-free. However, the trial was designed primarily to confirm the safety of the vaccine and immune response, not to test its effectiveness, and because the patients received other treatments, it is not possible to say whether the vaccine helped: “I would be speculating if I said that the vaccine had any benefit to the patients,” Linette says.But the fact that the study found “a pretty high magnitude of immune response,” combined with recent reports that a different neoantigen vaccine can fight cancer in mice, suggests the idea is “promising,” Slingluff says.Such a vaccine, which should be less toxic than chemotherapy, might be used to prevent cancer from recurring after surgery. It might also be combined with other immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors that seem to work best for cancers such as lung and melanoma in which tumors have many mutations. “The high anticipation is whether the one-two punch with checkpoint inhibition would work,” says Roger Lo, a melanoma researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles.last_img read more