New travel restrictions go into effect at Miami International Airport

first_imgThis past weekend, the White House announced increased restrictions on international travel due to the coronavirus, or COVID-19.The Miami International Airport has already started taking precautions. Extra screening is being done for travelers returning from China.Alitalia, an Italian based air carrier, started taking precautionary measures and are pre-screening all passengers traveling from Rome to MIA. Delta Airlines also announced the company would be canceling flights from New York to Milan due to COVID-19. American Airlines also suspended their flights from MIA and John F. Kennedy International Airport to Milan due to “low demand.”The travel advisory for Italy and South Korea has been increased to a level four, the highest level.Starting Monday, foreign nationals will not be allowed to enter the U.S. if they have visited Iran in the last 14 days.,This past weekend, the White House announced increased restrictions on international travel due to the coronavirus, or COVID-19.The Miami International Airport has already started taking precautions. Extra screening is being done for travelers returning from China.Alitalia, an Italian based air carrier, started taking precautionary measures and are pre-screening all passengers traveling from Rome to MIA. Delta Airlines also announced the company would be canceling flights from New York to Milan due to COVID-19. American Airlines also suspended their flights from MIA and John F. Kennedy International Airport to Milan due to “low demand.”The travel advisory for Italy and South Korea has been increased to a level four, the highest level.Starting Monday, foreign nationals will not be allowed to enter the U.S. if they have visited Iran in the last 14 days.last_img read more

Qatar 2022 World Cup bid accused of offering money

first_imgA member of the Qatar 2022 World Cup bidding campaign has told France Football she saw colleagues offering money to African federations in return for support for the Gulf state’s candidacy.Phaedra Almajid worked as the Qatar bid’s press attach for international media between April 2009 and March 2010.An American citizen with Arab origins, Almajid went with the bid team to the Confederation of African Football (CAF) congress in the Angolan capital, Luanda, in January 2010, some 11 months before FIFA controversially voted to award Qatar the right to stage the 2022 finals.After being asked to serve as an interpreter for a Qatari official in a Luanda hotel suite, Almajid told France Football she witnessed significant sums being promised to individual African federations.Almajid said: “I hadn’t been warned about anything. The first person to come into the suite was an African football official. Charming and very imposing. We made small talk.”The Qatari who was there expressed his delight that Africa was staging a World Cup the following summer and added that he felt it was legitimate for the Arab world to soon have their turn. We speak about the Football Dreams project of the Aspire academy. You can imagine the kind of conversation. “Three other people are present. One of them, who only spoke French, made the first opening. They said that the Qataris were delighted that this important official was there and that they wished for his federation to have a donation of one million dollars.”Not personally, of course. Let things be clear: I only ever heard talk of federations. The man replied, without even looking at the Qatari: ‘Oh, a million dollars…why not a one-and-a-half million?’ The Qatari said that he hoped he could count on his support. The person concerned assured him that would be the case. And that was it! I had never seen an offer so direct. I was shocked. And that person left.”Almajid said a second individual arrived shortly afterwards and the same scene was played out.”The only difference, as would also be the case with a third visitor, is that the offer was immediately one of one-and-a-half million dollars,” she added. “The Qatari told me I must never mention it. To no-one.FIFA’s Secretary General insists ongoing claims of corruption and confusion over the Garcia report have not cost them sponsors.”He was shouting. It was two in the morning. I’m an Arab woman. He told me to shut my mouth and I had to obey them. I suppose they never thought a woman could disobey them. The Arabs call me a traitor because you don’t do that among Arabs.” Almajid said she signed a statement retracting these claims, which filtered through to the British media, in July 2011 due to threats she had received and in fear of what may happen to her two autistic sons.She gave evidence to Michael Garcia, the man appointed by FIFA to look into the attribution of the 2018 World Cup to Russia and the 2022 voting process, only after assurances of anonymity.She claimed, however, that the subsequent publication of an overview of Garcia’s report by Hans-Joachim Eckert, chairman of the adjudicatory chamber of the FIFA Ethics Committee, had identified her, and left her with no choice other than to speak out publicly.”I didn’t choose, Judge Eckert chose for me. Firstly, Qatar made me sign a document retracting my claims. And now FIFA is trying to silence me. Michael Garcia promised me confidentiality,” she said.”Nothing proves that he didn’t respect that. I don’t know anything more than what is in his report. I can’t accuse him of anything. On the other hand, Eckert and FIFA have not been loyal to me. Eckert left me with no choice. He has thrown me to the lions by identifying me in his report. And FIFA owe me an explanation at least. What those officials did was so calculated.”last_img read more

‘Hypochondriac’ Chris Paul a proponent for LASIK

first_imgPaul underwent LASIK eye surgery this summer as part of an offseason filled with medical procedures. In a span of three weeks, Paul had his hand operated on, his eyes fixed and a sports hernia repaired.The LASIK, which was performed by Dr. Kerry Assil in Beverly Hills, caused Paul the most distress.Despite years of telling reporters that his rolled ankles and sprained fingers would be “fine,” on Wednesday, Paul admitted the truth. He’s a hypochondriac.“If something is wrong, I feel like I’m dying,” he said. “When I got the LASIK, they had to give me two Valiums. They tell you it’s going to be grainy for a couple of weeks. I had to put eye drops in for two weeks, four times a day. I was having panic attacks.“I couldn’t sleep. These are your eyes. They get dry. I was stressed out.”When talking about the surgery, which family members had been pushing him to get for years, Paul repeatedly said, “These are your eyes” with disbelief in his voice because of how crazy the notion of laser surgery there seems to him.And, when you’ve watched him play, it makes sense.For years, Paul’s vision has been what’s helped separate him from the rest of the NBA. He’s averaged 9.9 assists per game, leading the league in that category four times. He’s always scanning the floor, looking for the open player or the perfect pass.But, apparently, it would have been easier if he had put on a pair of readers.“As long as I could see the rim,” he said, “I felt like I was cool.”But the Paul family knew what LASIK could do. His father and brother both had the procedure during Paul’s rookie season and they raved about the results. While they were seeing 20/20, Paul was struggling to see when he looked over at the bench.“Everyone used to tell me I squinted on the court,” Paul said. “Like when (coach) Doc (Rivers) was trying to get my attention to call a play, they’d say I squinted all the time.”At his mother’s urging, Paul decided to put his fears, with the help of sedatives, to rest and allow a doctor to slice open his corneas with a laser and reshape his vision.“It was probably the most nerve-wracking thing I ever did,” he said, adding that it helped that close friends LeBron James and Dwyane Wade previously had the procedure.During his recovery, Paul was so concerned when anything was slightly off, he said he called his eye doctor almost daily for three consecutive weeks.“My nerves; my anxiety,” he said. “Those are your eyes!”Paul’s through the anxiety now and he’s an advocate for the procedure. He talked Indiana’s Paul George through his recovery. On Wednesday, he sermonized on the advantages and marveled at his improvement.When he opened his eyes the morning after the surgery, he knew what the rest of the NBA was about to find out.“Oh my God,” he said. “… I can damn near read the fine print.”Oh my God, indeed. There was a small catch, though. Paul wasn’t reading from anything at all. There wasn’t an eye chart inside the Clippers practice facility.He’d memorized the 15 letters, maybe in an effort to convince eye doctors he didn’t need to correct his vision.“Somebody (over the years) might have said I needed contacts or glasses,” Paul said.Until this past May, Paul never considered listening.Six months later, he’s reading the fine print on water bottles 10 feet away. He’s reading street signs at night. And, in what might not be a coincidence, Paul is above his career numbers in every category and making 3-pointers and free throws at a rate better than he had in his 11 previous NBA seasons. LOS ANGELES>> Chris Paul, the Clippers’ sure-fire Hall of Fame point guard, listed them off one after another.“F-E-L-O-P-Z-D. D-E-F-P-O-T-E-C”He recited the 20/25 and 20/20 lines on the eye chart in rapid succession. He didn’t pause to squint. He didn’t strain a single muscle on his face. He made it, pardon the pun, look easy.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more